In U.S. Senate race, mining takes center stage on Range

  • Article by: ABBY SIMONS , Star Tribune
  • Updated: August 23, 2014 - 9:59 PM

As the issue heats up, Franken and McFadden seize on their differences.

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– As it stands, the heart of the PolyMet Mining Corp.’s proposal is little more than a shell of abandoned buildings housing rusted machinery.

But the massive would-be copper-nickel mine on the Iron Range is already churning up the U.S. Senate race between Democratic Sen. Al Franken and his Republican challenger, businessman Mike McFadden. Both sides have seized on mining — the Iron Range’s industry and identity — and the right balance between jobs, the economy and the environment to galvanize voters.

Democrats and union leaders have pounced on comments McFadden made earlier this month, that he would opt for Chinese steel over U.S. steel to build the Keystone XL Pipeline if it were cheaper. That angered Minnesota miners, who’ve accused China and other countries of illegally “dumping” cheap steel in the United States.

Meanwhile, Republicans are capitalizing on the divide between Democratic environmentalists and laborers by decrying the amount of regulation the PolyMet project must undergo, including a final environmental impact study due for completion this fall.

On the day he toured PolyMet, McFadden pledged that “on Day 1” as a U.S. senator he would urge the Environmental Protection Agency and other federal regulators to expedite the yearslong project.

“We are standing at the doorstep of a new era on the Iron Range, and we need our regulators to work with these companies to bring jobs and economic opportunities to this region,” McFadden said. “Our state agencies are leaders in the area and more than equipped to handle this process. I respectfully request that Senator Franken stand with me.”

On a Minnesota State Fair visit Thursday, Franken defended the extended environmental review of the project, adding that it’s not within a U.S. senator’s purview to control the speed of how federal regulators do their jobs.

“I think virtually everyone in this state would like to see those jobs, would like to see those metals mined, but only if we protect the water. I think we can do both,” he said.

Just a few miles from PolyMet, the mine-centric politics are evident in a half-dozen yard placards planted below a sign welcoming visitors to Aurora. Amid signs that simply say, “We Support Mining,” another urges the ouster of DFL State Auditor Rebecca Otto, the lone Minnesota Executive Council member who cast a vote against leases to three mining companies to explore for and mine minerals. Others bear McFadden’s double M logo above the words “McFadden supports Chinese Steel.” Similar signs popped up in the region the day the candidate visited PolyMet.

There were no Franken placards beneath the Aurora sign.

‘Big issue, but not only issue’

A fourth-generation miner, LaTisha Gietzen speaks with as much enthusiasm about how PolyMet’s mine will function as she does about its role in resurrecting the Iron Range’s economy. With the opening of its precious metals mine, PolyMet has pledged to invest $650 million and create up to 360 jobs, with an additional $500 million a year over 20 years.

Hours before McFadden’s visit, Gietzen, PolyMet’s director of public and government affairs, showed a reporter and photographer around the long-closed LTV taconite mine that PolyMet would like to revive.

Press and politicians are always welcome to tour the place, she said — but not at the same time. It just doesn’t look good.

“For us it’s not about politics. We’ll talk to anybody and everybody, but we are not gonna make it a stump speech,” Gietzen said. “We’ve been consistent in my seven years here that it’s not a campaign; there’s no good to come of it and there’s no reason. It doesn’t matter what party or who it is.”

Days after he stood front and center at a news conference surrounded by Iron Range politicians and labor leaders to criticize McFadden’s Chinese steel comments, DFL state Rep. Jason Metsa settled down in a Virginia bar to talk strategy. Metsa is confident that the ideology on the Range tilts toward Franken. It’s just a matter of action.

“It’s pretty clear that Republicans are going to go out and have their base come out, like they do, a little stronger than ours, typically,” Metsa said. “We have a lot of drop-offs after a presidential year. We’re going to focus on getting those people out and reminding them that voting is not every four years.”

Metsa said the party still bears some trauma from longtime Democratic U.S. Rep. Jim Oberstar’s 2010 loss to Republican Chip Cravaack, despite the recovery of the seat by Democrat Rick Nolan two years later. Nolan also faces a close race from challenger Stewart Mills, a race both sides are watching closely.

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  • Bruce Richardson, vice president of corporate communications for PolyMet, strolled through one of the buildings at the old LTV site in Hoyt Lakes.

  • McFadden:“We are standing at the doorstep of a new era on the Iron Range, and we need our regulators to work with these companies to bring jobs. ...”GOP Senate candidate Mike McFadden

  • PolyMet would use the mothballed LTV site near Hoyt Lakes, Minn., as part of its copper-nickel mining quest — a hot issue in the U.S. Senate race.

  • Franken: “I think virtually everyone in this state would like to see those jobs ... but only if we can protect the water. I think we can do both.”

  • Lawn signs planted at a sign welcoming visitors to Aurora tell of what’s on people’s minds.

  • Rep. Jason Metsa, DFL-Virginia, thought Sen. Al Franken had a good chance of winning in the 8th district.

  • Ron Britton, chair of the St. Louis County Republican Party, at his office in Virginia: “This could be the area that makes or breaks us.”

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