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More than $715K poured into political groups recently

Posted by: Rachel E. Stassen-Berger under Funding, Minnesota campaigns, Republicans Updated: July 31, 2014 - 3:58 PM

In the last few weeks, more than $715,000 in political cash has changed hands in Minnesota politics.

According to reports filed in recent days, the Alliance for a Better Minnesota, Education Minnesota, Freedom Minnesota PAC and DFL auditor candidate Matt Entenza have gotten big cash infusions.

The Alliance, largely funded by unions and wealthy Minnesotans, received $275,000 on Monday from WIN Minnesota. The Alliance is the communications arm for Democratic causes, running ads and dealing with the media. WIN Minnesota is largely the funding arm.

The Education Minnesota teacher's union, one of the most politically active labor groups in the state, transferred $125,000 to its political PAC last week. The union derives money from member dues and the PAC spends money on politics.

The Laborers District Council of Minnesota and North Dakota also received a cash infusion from its parent union. According to a filing, the union's political arm received $64,000 from the union.

On Tuesday, the Freedom Minnesota PAC received a $25,000 donation from Daniel Loeb, a New York-based hedge fund manager.

Freedom Minnesota PAC was started to help state Rep. Jenifer Loon in her August primary fight. Loon is being challenged by a fellow Republican in large part because she voted to legalize same-sex marriage last year.

Loeb and his firm have been active supporters of same-sex marriage and gay rights.

Meanwhile, DFLer Entenza gave his campaign for auditor $227,000. Entenza is a state House member who ran for governor in 2010. He donated more than $5 million of his own money to that campaign.

This year, he is waging a primary campaign against DFL auditor Rebecca Otto.

State law requires candidates and campaigns to file reports within 24 hours of receiving big contributions since it is so close to the primary election day.

The cash on the recent filings is in addition to the fundraising the campaigns reported earlier this week.

Updated

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