With an insider’s eye, Hot Dish tracks the tastiest bits of Minnesota’s political scene and keep you up-to-date on those elected to serve you.

Contributors in Minnesota: Patrick Condon, Baird Helgeson, Patricia Lopez, Jim Ragsdale, Abby Simons, Rachel E. Stassen-Berger and Glen Stubbe. Contributors in D.C.: Allison Sherry, Corey Mitchell and Jim Spencer.

On tax filing deadline, Dayton touts benefits of cuts

Posted by: Abby Simons under Minnesota governor Updated: April 15, 2014 - 3:54 PM

Touting millions of dollars in savings for Minnesota taxpayers on Tuesday’s filing deadline, Gov. Mark Dayton said he hopes for another round of cuts benefiting homeowners and working parents.

“I believe there will be another tax cut bill that will come after the Legislature returns,” he said. “I’m hoping for property tax relief and also the childcare tax credit that was in my original message and which I still believe would be of enormous benefit to people whose childcare costs are going up astronomically. It’s staggering to me how very young families are spending $10-15,000 per child. That’s outrageously high costs and we need to do something to relieve that burden.”

Dayton made the comments after declaring Tuesday “Tax Cut Day,” introducing two families who benefited from the $508 million in tax cuts: the Zuzeks of Hastings, who benefit from college tuition tax deductions for their three children, and Kristy and Aaron Norman of Rochester, who saved $800 in state taxes related to the adoption of their two children.

 With hours left to go before the filing deadline, Minnesota Department of Revenue Commissioner Myron Frans said 2.2 million Minnesotans filed their taxes as of Monday night, with 500,000 to go.

Dayton said the tax cuts are another step forward, calling Minnesota a “high tax state but a high value state.”

“We have an excellent workforce, people who are hardworking, educated and company after company has been expanding here in Minnesota at a pace that exceeds the nation because they recognize the value.” he said.

The cuts follow a $2.1 billion tax increased imposed last year.


 

ADVERTISEMENT

Connect with twitterConnect with facebookConnect with Google+Connect with PinterestConnect with PinterestConnect with RssfeedConnect with email newsletters

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT