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Continued: Minnesota cops, prosecutors object to immunity in heroin bill

  • Article by: ABBY SIMONS , Star Tribune
  • Last update: April 8, 2014 - 11:20 PM

Kingrey said immunity makes sense for lower-level drug offenses. But, he added, “when law enforcement happens upon a very chaotic scene, to not allow law enforcement to place people under arrest until they can sort through the facts is very troubling to us.”

The House version of Steve’s Law at one point didn’t contain the immunity language, but is now similar to the Senate bill. Lexi Reed-Holtum, Rummler’s fiancé and vice president of the Steve Rummler Hope Foundation, said that foundation’s research has shown that immunity has often led law enforcement to the source of the drug problem, rather than exacerbating it.

“We have vetted this issue with 14 other states that have a good Samaritan law, asking them, ‘What kind of unintended consequences are you having?’ ” Reed-Holtum said. “The response we have gotten back overwhelmingly is not only this not doing harm, it is actually building a bridge that did not exist before.”

Sen. Bill Ingebrigtsen, R-Alexandria, was initially the lone “no” vote on the Senate bill Tuesday before changing his mind.

“I’ve always had a little problem with the immunity part of it, however, quite frankly, some of these calls would not happen unless we pass a law like this,” he said afterward.

Ingebrigtsen added, “the bottom line is, if nobody’s gonna call, somebody’s gonna die.”

Abby Simons • 651-925-5043

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