Dayton to have procedure done on hip

Governor will visit Mayo Clinic for an injection, then have limited activity this month.

Hobbled for months by a hip injury, Gov. Mark Dayton will get an injection on Wednesday calculated to help him heal.

Dayton’s office said that the governor’s mobility will be very limited and that he will have no public events through the rest of the month, following an injection of platelet-rich plasma at the Mayo Clinic.

The procedure is expected to last about one hour, under local anesthesia, according to Dayton’s staff, with the governor returning to St. Paul afterward.

Doctors have instructed him to keep all of his weight off the hip for two days after the injection and to expect “very limited mobility” for two weeks.

During that healing period, Dayton plans to conduct business from his St. Paul home and stay out of the public eye, his office said.

According to the Mayo Clinic’s description of the procedure, provided by the governor’s office: “Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is a nontoxic, nonimmune substance that accelerates healing. PRP is produced from the person’s own blood, using a process called platelet enrichment activation … These concentrated platelets are then injected into the injured muscle to promote healing.”

The 66-year-old governor popped out his left hip over the summer and later discovered that he had torn and detached the sartorius muscle.

Dayton, who is running for re-election, has limited his physical activity since the accident, but the hip has not healed.

Late last year, <URL destination="http://www.startribune.com/politics/statelocal/184422431.html">the governor visited the Mayo Clinic for surgery to fuse a vertebra<PARAGRAPH style="$ID/[No paragraph style]">can you fuse just one? - clips and google are inconclusive so let stand

Rachel E. Stassen-Berger • Twitter: @RachelSB

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