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Continued: Faster, more reliable voting machines coming in metro area

  • Article by: LAURIE BLAKE , Star Tribune
  • Last update: July 5, 2013 - 11:17 PM

Unlike the old optical-scan machines, which simply scanned the ballot to count the marks, the new digital-scan technology “makes a digital image of the ballot, then looks for darkened pixels in the vote target area,” she said. “If enough darkened pixels are detected, the machine registers the vote.’’

The county has the option to program the machines to keep the images for later use. “One use of these ballot images could be counting write-in votes, rather than going back through and using the physical ballots for that,’’ Gelms said.

How those images might be used, whether they would be open to public view and whether they could prove useful in recounts are all legal questions that will have to be addressed, Gelms said. While the topic is up for discussion, Hennepin County has decided not to collect images in the August primaries.

 

Laurie Blake • 952-746-3287

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  • Hennepin County elections worker Luke Belant demonstrated Friday how to cast a ballot with a new election machine, on display at Hennepin County Government Center in downtown Minneapolis.

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