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Continued: Bachmann's legal troubles rooted in presidential campaign divisions

  • Article by: KEVIN DIAZ , Star Tribune
  • Last update: April 22, 2013 - 9:58 AM

That came at a staff luncheon the morning after the caucuses, when Heki says Bachmann told her that Sorenson had taken the database. “I was absolutely shocked,” Heki said of the conversation. Woolson, in an affidavit, confirmed that he overheard the exchange.

In the absence of any public acknowledgment, Heki filed suit in Iowa against Bachmann and her top aides. Waldron, meanwhile, chose to remain silent during Bachmann’s subsequent re-election campaign for Congress, a decision he said he now regrets.

After the elections, Waldron, Parrish and Heckman found themselves still owed money by the presidential campaign. In Waldron’s case, it was a mere $916.67 — a pittance in a $10 million campaign.

The Bachmann political organization, a cash cow fabled for its fundraising ability, was good for the money but imposed a condition: To get their back pay, former staffers would have to sign nondisclosure agreements. Political operatives say that’s typical in campaigns, though not necessarily a year after a campaign closes up shop.

Waldron refused, alleging that the campaign was attempting to silence him and others with evidence of wrongdoing. Instead, in January 2013, he went public with his complaints on a Christian wire service.

It was a case of a third-rate burglary no longer.

 

Kevin Diaz • on Twitter @StribDiaz

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