With an insider’s eye, Hot Dish tracks the tastiest bits of Minnesota’s political scene and keep you up-to-date on those elected to serve you.

Contributors in Minnesota: Patrick Condon, J. Patrick Coolican, Patricia Lopez, Ricardo Lopez, Abby Simons, and Glen Stubbe. Contributors in D.C.: Allison Sherry, Jim Spencer and intern Beena Raghavendran.

Posts about Minnesota campaigns

Late money still coming in

Posted by: J. Patrick Coolican Updated: October 31, 2014 - 3:18 PM

Still more money is flowing into campaigns during the final days, with a special emphasis on the battle for control of the Minnesota House. 

The Minnesota Jobs Coalition, a Republican-aligned group playing in legislative races across the state, received $30,000 today from the Washington-based Republican State Leadership Committee, as well as $5,000 from the Minnesota Food Coalition. 

WIN Minnesota, a funding arm of the Democratic Alliance for a Better Minnesota, received $20,000 Wednesday from Education Minn PAC, the political action committee of the teachers union. 

See this earlier post for details on other large donations since last week. 

For a complete list of late, large donations, see this page from the Minnesota Campaign Finance and Public Disclosure Board and click on the date to see the donations. 

In U forum, Johnson talks education policy, tax reform

Posted by: Ricardo Lopez Updated: October 30, 2014 - 1:41 PM

Jeff Johnson, the GOP nominee for governor, said during a forum Thursday hosted at the Humphrey School of Public Affairs that he would focus on comprehensive tax reform, the state's transportation infrastructure and education policy if he is elected governor. 

The forum, moderated by political science professor Larry Jacobs, touched on a wide range of topics -- including the state's business climate and the creation of well-paying jobs -- but Johnson did not deviate from well-established positions on taxes and education.

Johnson told a small crowd of two dozen students that he would be an "engaged governor" and would work to reduce tax rates in Minnesota, including the corporate tax rate which he said discourages businesses from coming to the state. 

The state's tax climate, Johnson said, needs a major overhaul. "We have a tax system that is decades old," he said. "It's about being competitive with other states." 

On transportation, Johnson said he would oppose new forms of revenue, including a gas tax, and instead would pay for infrastructure maintenance through the issuing of state bonds. He said the focus would be on roads and bridges, not light-rail construction. 

"I'm not an anti-train guy," he said. "I'm a cost-benefit analysis guy."

On education, Johnson favors more local control for schools and said schools should be able to follow best practices to work in narrowing the state's achievement gap. 

With five days left until the election, Johnson will be busy meeting with voters. His schedule Thursday also included stops in Red Wing.  

Another round of GOP mailers draws ire from DFL, this time over drunken driving

Posted by: Abby Simons Updated: October 29, 2014 - 4:59 PM

Another series of mailers targeting DFL House members up for re-election has again drawn the ire of the party after saying Democrats are responsible for “putting convicted drunk drivers back on the roads” for passing legislation requiring people with multiple DWI convictions to use an ignition-interlock device. The mailers also triggered a response from the national president for Mothers Against Drunk Driving and, locally, Minnesotans for Safe Driving.

The mailers, which again target at least half-dozen DFL House members, give various accusations that they voted to make it easier for convicted drunken drivers to get back behind the wheel. One calls St. Cloud Rep. Zach Dorholt a "bar owner" who “weakened penalties for horrific drunk driving crashes,” while another says Eagan Rep. Sandra Masin “Weakened penalties for dangerous drunk drivers. Putting our families in harm’s way?” imposed over a background of a shattered windshield. The mailers are each marked as paid for by the Republican Party of Minnesota.

DFL House caucus spokesman Michael Howard said the mail pieces refer to HF 2255, legislation that requires people with multiple drunken-driving convictions to use an ignition-interlock device, which requires a breath test by the driver before the vehicle can be started. The bill passed 71-57 in the House and unanimously in the Minnesota Senate.

“These last-minute attacks are designed to leave candidates with no time to respond and set the record straight, and they are shameful,” House Speaker Paul Thissen said in a statement.

The mailers are the second in a row that drew ire from the DFL, after others accused lawmakers of  making it easier for felons to work in schools. The mailer was in reference to a bill reforming the state’s expungement laws. The DFL alerted representatives of the Minnesota County Attorneys Association, who in a letter called the mailers “misleading.”

The Republican Party of Minnesota did not respond to a request for comment.

The mailers also triggered a response from MADD National President Jan Withers, who said the organization backed the legislation because she said requiring an interlock device is more effective than license revocation alone.

“MADD supported these measures because simply hoping that convicted DWI offenders will not drive on a revoked license is bad public policy,” Withers wrote in the letter to Thissen. “License revocation without an interlock requirement is like using cancer treatments that were best practices 25 years ago. If this ‘treatment’ were effective, there would not be over 63,000 Minnesota residents with three or more DWI convictions on their driving records.”

The letter does not appear to address the mailers, but instead thanks lawmakers “for working to reform the state’s drunken-driving law.”

Nancy Johnson, legislative liaison for Minnesotans for Safe Driving and a victim of drunken driving, expressed similar support for the law in a letter to Thissen, while condemning the mailers.

"The idea that the Legislature was being soft on drunk drivers when they passed a bill in 2014 which allowed those arrested and/or convicted of (criminal vehicular operation) to have Ignition Interlock available to them is ridiculous." Johnson wrote.

Read the MADD letter below:

MADD Letter 10-29-14

Franken backs Ebola travel ban with exception for U.S. aid workers

Posted by: Abby Simons Updated: October 29, 2014 - 1:24 PM

With days to go until the election, U.S. Sen. Al Franken on Wednesday said that a proposed travel ban to and from Ebola-stricken west African nations, should be extended to third-party countries for travelers not on direct flights, with special considerations for U.S. aid workers.

“I believe that we should have a travel ban on people who are coming from those third (party) countries who aren’t U.S. citizens and who aren’t medical personnel who are doing that work,” Franken told reporters after a Minnesota DFL Get Out the Vote event.  “I think that makes sense but that’s insufficient because most of the people coming from those three countries are U.S. citizens and of course we want to incentivize people do to that work and we want them to be able to come back.”

Franken applauded Gov. Mark Dayton’s Ebola restrictions, which requires a 21-day home quarantine for health workers returning to Minnesota after treating afflicted patients.

Franken’s opponent, Republican businessman Mike McFadden, who supports a travel ban, has repeatedly hammered Franken over Ebola, alleging a lack of leadership, and barraging voters with mailers and phone calls regarding Franken’s early departure from a congressional Ebola hearing last month.

Yesterday the McFadden campaign launched a radio advertisement featuring audio from last Sunday’s debate on WCCO TV when Franken struggled to say whether he supported a travel ban, finally saying that he had “nothing against it” but that he believed it would be insufficient because the majority of travelers from West Africa don’t fly directly to the United States.
 

DSCC job? 'No,' says Franken. 'I haven't even considered that,' says Klobuchar

Posted by: Updated: October 29, 2014 - 2:15 PM

Minnesota's U.S. Senators, both mentioned by the National Journal as possible future chairs of the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee, did not cozy up to the possibility on Wednesday.

"They can do whatever they like," Sen. Al Franken said of the National Journal's speculative piece. Asked if he was interested in the job, he said, directly:  "No."

Sen. Amy Klobuchar was not quite as dismissive but did not confirm any interest.

"I am focused on this election," she said as she and other Democrats set off from the Minnesota Capitol to campaign.

"I haven't even considered that," she said.

Although, when asked, Franken denied any interest in the gig heading up Democratic senators' campaign arm, Franken challenger Mike McFadden's campaign sought to bash Franken because of the National Journal mention.

"Senator Franken has repeatedly denied his partisan nature, but the fact of the matter is that by Franken’s own admission, he is seeking the ‘most partisan’ job in the Senate,” McFadden said in a new release Wednesday morning.

Franken has never said he is seeking the DSCC job and confirmed on Wednesday that he is not.

Photo: U.S. Sens. Amy Klobuchar, Al Franken and other Democrats as rallied before campaigning across the state.

Updated

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