With an insider’s eye, Hot Dish tracks the tastiest bits of Minnesota’s political scene and keep you up-to-date on those elected to serve you.

Contributors in Minnesota: Patrick Condon, J. Patrick Coolican, Patricia Lopez, Ricardo Lopez, Abby Simons, Rachel E. Stassen-Berger and Glen Stubbe. Contributors in D.C.: Allison Sherry and Jim Spencer.

Posts about State budgets

Zellers touts Dayton's 'surrender' after shutdown

Posted by: Updated: July 14, 2014 - 11:52 AM

Republican gubernatorial candidate and former House Speaker Kurt Zellers is claiming credit for getting DFL Mark Dayton to “surrender” after the government shutdown three years ago.

"Democrats, political pundits, special interest groups, and even many Republicans predicted that we wouldn't hold to our principles," Zellers said Monday, marking the three-year anniversary of the end of the shutdown. "But I did not surrender and the GOP legislative majorities did not cave. Instead, it was Governor Dayton who surrendered to us after two weeks."

Dayton and the Republican-led Legislature could not agree on the budget and sent the state into a three-week partial government shutdown, the longest in state history. The state faced a multibillion-dollar deficit and the two sides could not agree the best way to patch up the budget.

Dayton wanted more than $2 billion in tax increases mostly on high earners. Zellers and other Republicans refused to raise taxes and instead wanted to borrow money from K-12 public schools and sell bonds backed by the state’s tobacco settlement.

Dayton eventually agreed to accept the Republican plan, though remained sharply critical of the borrowing.

While Dayton did not get his way in the shutdown, Minnesota voters jettisoned enough Republicans in the next election to give Democrats control of both the House and the Senate. Zellers lost his leardership position, too.

After their historic gains, Dayton and legislative Democrats eventually did raise taxes on high earners and smokers to balance the state budget. The economic recovery allowed to state to repay all of the money borrowed from public schools.

Zellers said he still believes the tax increases were bad for Minnesotans.

"I understood that it was wrong to force middle-class families to pay more for government during an economic downturn,” Zellers said. "I'm the only candidate who has proven his strength and his commitment to conservative principles to be able to beat Dayton and the liberal interest groups again in November."

Minnesota tax collections beat annual target by $168 million

Posted by: Updated: July 10, 2014 - 4:15 PM

Minnesota tax collections surpassed expectations by $168 million over the last year, boosted largely by stronger than expected income and sales tax revenue.

Revenue collections had lagged slightly the last few months, but surging state income tax payments allowed state to take in $235 million more than state budget officials estimated for that period.

Corporate income taxes were down slightly, but higher than expected sales tax revenue helped make up for it. The corporate tax is the most volatile, and wild swings are not uncommon.

Minnesota budget officials warn that the U.S. economy hit "a deep pothole” at the beginning of 2014, resulting in the worst quarterly performance since the depths of the Great Recession in early 2009.

Economic experts attributed the drop to a sharp swing in the trade deficit, a surprise fall in health care spending and extreme winter weather. The bad weather slowed consumer spending, housing, and industrial activity.

Economists say the economy is staring to improve rapidly, with faster employment and income growth, along with improving home and vehicle sales.

Minnesota makes another push for income tax reciprocity

Posted by: Updated: June 19, 2014 - 3:04 PM

Minnesota and Wisconsin residents who live in one state but work in the other could soon have their income taxes dramatically simplified as part of a new tax reciprocity proposal.

Minnesota revenue officials on Thursday offered to lower Wisconsin’s annual payment by $1 million if the Badger state approves of the agreement by Sept. 30.

‘That millions dollars is part of Minnesota’s strong desire to reinstate income tax reciprocity,” said Sen. Roger Reinert, a Duluth Democrat who has worked with other border legislators for an agreement. “This really is us extending a hand and saying, ‘Work with us.’”

Wisconsin and Minnesota have not been able to broker a new arrangement since the four decade old income tax reciprocity agreement lapsed at the end of 2009. Suddenly, 80,000 residents who lived in one state but worked over the border had to file income taxes in both states.

Wisconsin revenue officials could not immediately be reached for comment.

The deadlock has come down to money.

Minnesota revenue officials studied the issue and determined that about 56,000 Wisconsin residents work in Minnesota, more than double the amount of Gopher state residents who cross the border for work.

Minnesota's study concluded that Wisconsin needs to pay about $92.5 million a year due to the difference.

The problem is, that’s about $4 million more than Wisconsin officials believe they should pay.

Minnesota made similar offers in 2012 and 2013, but both offers included the $4 million gap. Wisconsin officials rejected both proposals.

This year, Minnesota legislators decided to see if an additional $1 million might sweeten the deal.

“It really is a desire on the part of border legislators who are trying to make it a little smoother,” said Minnesota Department of Revenue Commissioner Myron Frans.

Differing tax rates between the two states also aggravates the problem.

Minnesota limits the credit it offers consumers for taxes paid in another state to the amount they would pay if they lived in state. Frans said he does not believe Minnesota taxpayers should subsidize Wisconsin’s higher effective tax rate.

Wisconsin officials have said their residents already pay enough.

Reinert and other border legislators said they still routinely hear from residents frustrated with having to file two state income tax forms.

Business owners, Reinert said, are just as frustrated that they have to keep two sets of tax records for employees who live across the border.

The issue boiled over in 2009 as the economy tanked and budget officials in both states were desperate for money.

Wisconsin delayed its payments to balance the state budget, creating a deeper hole for Minnesota's budget officials.

Then-Gov. Tim Pawlenty grew frustrated and let the program expire, saying that Wisconsin’s 17-month delay was too much for Minnesota’s shaky budget.

The new agreement allows Wisconsin to make four equal payments a year, minimizing one-time blows that can be difficult in a sagging economy.

For state leaders, the issue has become a balance between protecting state money and promoting convenience for taxpayers.

Frans said the governor authorized the new $1 million dollar offer, but they refuse to make a deal unless it is fair for all Minnesota taxpayers.

Minnesota still has reciprocity agreements with Michigan and North Dakota.

Dayton off to D.C. to press for water project funding, talk economy

Posted by: Updated: June 10, 2014 - 10:02 PM

DFL Gov. Mark Dayton is traveling to Washington, D.C., Wednesday to push for federal money for the Lewis & Clark fresh water pipeline in southwest Minnesota.

Dayton will attend a meeting hosted by U.S. Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., with U.S. Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell. The governor, U.S. Sen Al Franken, D-Minn., and other members of Minnesota's congressional delegation plan to stress the water project’s economic importance to southwestern Minnesota.

Minnesota's political leaders are pressing the federal government to commit funding to reduce or eliminate any additional costs to area residents and local governments.

Minnesota legislators approved an agreement at the end of the last legislative session that speeds the full payment for the $77 million project, which means local communities don’t have to wait for the full federal portion.

On Thursday, Dayton and ten Minnesota business leaders will meet with senior White House officials for a roundtable discussion on Minnesota’s rebounding economy.

Later that afternoon, Dayton will attend a celebration at the White House to honor the Minnesota Lynx for winning their third WNBA Championship in 2014.

Minnesota tax revenue lags slightly in May

Posted by: Updated: June 10, 2014 - 4:08 PM

Minnesotans paid more than $1.4 billion in state taxes in May, about $17 million less than state budget officials predicted.

Individual income tax collections were $15 million, or 2.3 percent, less than protected. Sales taxes nearly hit their target, coming in at $372 million, just $1 million below estimates. Other form of revenue beat targets by $22 million, offsetting much of the decline in other areas.

The state has taken in $16.8 billion for the fiscal year, about $95 million below the forecast.

Minnesota budget officials urge caution in interpreting revenue numbers, which can fluctuate wildly from month to month.

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