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Who spent what on the governor's race?

Posted by: Eric Roper under Minnesota governor Updated: February 1, 2011 - 2:25 PM

Final campaign finance figures were released on Tuesday morning for the Minnesota governor's race.

Some highlights:

  • Matt Entenza, who lost the DFL primary to Gov. Mark Dayton, spent more than any other candidate in the race. Altogether, Entenza doled out about $6 million over two years, about $5 million of which was his own money.
  • Dayton spent about $5.4 million over two years. He lent his own campaign just under $4 million. They spent about $2.7 million on television ads.
  • Dayton's recount fund raised $1.8 million, most of which came from unions. Dayton's father, the Democratic Governor's Association and the Democratic National Committee also gave large sums.
  • Alliance for a Better Minnesota spent about $5.7 million on the race, almost all of which went to television ads.
  • Republican candidate Tom Emmer spent about $2.86 million on the race.
  • Former House Speaker Margaret Kelliher, who lost the DFL primary, spent about $1.5 million during her campaign.
  • MN Forward, one of the conservative interest groups, spent about $1.4 million. Most of that was for television ads.
  • Minnesota's Future, the other conservative interest group, will report spending about $1.7 million, Minnesota Business Partnership spokesman Mark Giga tells Hot Dish this morning.
  • Independence Party Candidate Tom Horner's report has not been posted. says his campaign raised and spent about $1.3 million.

Update: Contributions and expenditures for Republican candidate Tom Emmer's recount effort will not be made public, according to MN GOP spokesman Mark Drake. Drake said the recount operation was paid for through a corporation called Count Them All Properly, which allows the party not to disclose their recount finances.

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