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Continued: History is not on the side of the latest budget panel

  • Article by: TOM RAUM , Associated Press
  • Last update: December 1, 2013 - 6:55 PM

“They just cannot overcome fundamental disagreements. Neither side really has any incentive to compromise with the other because they’re so far apart. The Democrats are not going to agree to a grand bargain that doesn’t include new tax revenues and the Republicans are not going to agree to a grand bargain that does include revenues,” Bartlett said.

Such panels “start off with a strike against them. Namely, that only the really tough stuff ends up on their plate,” said William Galston, who was a domestic policy adviser to Clinton. “And, obviously, all of this gets harder if you’re in a period of intense political polarization.”

 

  • related content

  • December 2010: Debt Commission co-chairs Erskine Bowles, left, and former Wyoming Sen. Alan Simpson produced a plan that was largely ignored by the White House and on Capitol Hill.

  • January 1984: President Ronald Reagan held up thick reports by J. Peter Grace, right, of the Private Sector Survey on Waste and Cost Control in Government. Little was done with the findings.

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