Many Visions, Many Versions

From gods and goddesses to questions about the Sept. 11 attacks, this huge show of mostly paintings from indigenous, rural communities in India has it all. Created by contemporary artists in Gond and Warli in central India, the Mithila region of Bihar and West Bengal, these large and colorful paintings were made to be seen. Bhajju Shyam’s portrayal of a two-headed fox is striking, as is Swarna Chitrakar’s “Tsunami,” a depiction of the 2004 disaster. Here, the goddess of destruction, Kali, is front and center, while elsewhere in the painting women without heads represent the dead and people near human-made structures suggest the living. (10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tue., Thu. & Fri.; 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Wed.; 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat.-Sun. Ends Jan. 6. Weisman Art Museum, 333 East River Rd., Mpls. 612-625-9494 or wam.umn.edu.)

Alicia Eler