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Continued: Readers Write (June 30): Marriage, voting rights, bike safety

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  • Last update: June 29, 2013 - 5:38 PM

DEFINING MARRIAGE

Court rulings won’t end the national debate

As the definition of marriage changes, the definitions of husband and wife change as well. In my (heterosexual) marriage, I have a job, mow the lawn and do the laundry. My husband has a job, fixes the plumbing and does the cooking. We both raised the children. The word “spouse” is a common, simple and acceptable acknowledgment that one person is married to another person.

MARY AXELROD, Bloomington

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The U.S. Supreme Court’s majority thinks that opposition to same-sex marriage is motivated by the malicious intent to disparage, injure, degrade, demean and humiliate gay people. Thank God for Justice Antonin Scalia, who in his dissent exposed the moralizing majority’s sententious sophistry.

MARK E. WALDELAND, Brooklyn

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SAND MINING

Associated activities also must be mitigated

The Star Tribune’s much-­welcomed editorial endorsement of strong sand mining safeguards alluded to the auxiliary operations of processing and transportation, which have their own negative impacts (“Enforce sand mine safeguards with vigor,” June 23). But the Editorial Board omitted a key point: Regulation of mining must include assurance that the associated processing and transportation will also be required to mitigate environmental impact. Transporting sand from Wisconsin to rail lines in Minnesota, for example, is already threatening the well-being of small river towns (see Wabasha for a case in point), with very little economic benefit in exchange. Wisconsin is happy to offload these impacts to an unsuspecting Minnesota. This cross-jurisdiction passing of the buck must be stopped.

ELLEN T. BROWN, St. Paul

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MANAGING PAIN

State needs marijuana for the chronically ill

Medical marijuana was not among the alternative pain relief methods mentioned in the last Sunday’s article (“For those in pain, changes fuel fears,” June 23). Why hasn’t this gotten off the ground in Minnesota? It does what it’s supposed to do — relieve pain — with much fewer adverse effects than oxycodone or other narcotics. It should be considered alongside other nonpharmacological interventions, because it works. Minnesota needs to catch up with the several states giving compassionate options to the chronically ill.

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