Charting America’s health care conundrum

  • Article by: RAY GRUMNEY
  • Updated: March 2, 2010 - 12:07 PM

The United States spends far more on health care than any other advanced country, yet Americans’ health is mediocre.

The complex and feverish health care debate that has preoccupied the nation for a year — and, off and on, for decades — is fueled by two facts: The United States spends far more on health care than any other advanced country, yet Americans’ health is mediocre, judging from broad statistical measures compiled by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). U.S. health spending per person is almost two and a half times the OECD average, while life expectancy is below average. Meanwhile, only three of the 30 OECD countries have still not achieved universal or near-universal health care coverage — Mexico, Turkey, and the United States.

See a chart of the costs and results here.

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