The Sunshine State is turning a cold shoulder to O.J. Simpson. Or at least Florida’s attorney general is.

Florida attorney general Pam Bondi has fired off a letter stating in no uncertain terms that The Juice should not be allowed to live in Florida when he’s released from prison, which could happen early next week.

During his parole hearing in July, Simpson said that he was considering moving to Florida upon his release. But that won’t happen if Bondi has her way about it. In a letter Friday to Florida Department of Corrections Secretary Julie L. Jones, Bondi asked that the department “immediately notify all appropriate authorities of Nevada that Florida objects to granting Simpson permission to relocate to Florida to serve parole.”

“Floridians are well aware of Mr. Simpson’s background, his wanton disregard for the lives of others, and of his scofflaw attitude with respect to the heinous acts for which he has been found civilly liable,” Bondi wrote in the letter. “The specter of his residing in comfort in Florida should not be an option. Numerous law enforcement officials in Florida agree with this position. Our state should not become a country club for this convicted criminal.”

Simpson is due to be paroled after serving nine years of a 33-year sentence for kidnapping and armed robbery, and famously had other legal issues in the 1990s. He currently resides in Lovelock Correctional Center in Nevada, though not for long.

In the letter, Bondi cited the Interstate Compact for Adult Supervision, noting, “While the Compact provides that a compacting State in which an offender has been convicted of a crime, served prison time, and been paroled possesses the authority to permit a parolee to relocate out-of-state, the receiving State also has the authority to deny such permission.”

Bondi continued, “In the case of Mr. Simpson, sound reasons exist for the State of Florida to object to permission being given for his relocation to Florida and for the State of Nevada to honor our objection by denying him such permission. Those reasons include the civil judgment entered against him for the wrongful deaths in the brutal slayings of Nicole Brown Simpson and Ron Goldman in 1994 in California, his failure to pay the related judgments of liability for those deaths (despite having ample means that have been declared beyond attaching to satisfy the judgments), his criminal activity that led to his arrest and incarceration in Las Vegas, the added burden that his notoriety would impose on law enforcement personnel in Florida, the heightened risk that he would place on the safety of the People of Florida, and his manifest lack of contrition for his crimes.”