You may have seen the widely distributed news story about the Mad Pooper, a woman who has been seen defecating on lawns in Colorado Springs, Colo. According to, on Sept. 25 an unidentified man claiming to be a spokesman for the Pooper posted (and has since removed) two videos in which he tried to justify her movements and win sympathy for her. In the videos, the spokesman says the unidentified Pooper is not responsible for her actions because she has suffered a traumatic brain injury and has had gender reassignment surgery, leaving her unable to control herself. He also claims her actions are protected by the First Amendment, in response to which Colorado Springs attorney Jeremy Loew called foul: "Defecating in someone's yard is definitely not protected under the First Amendment and it is actually a crime." Loew added: "People all over the world are talking about this, and police will catch her."

What's in a name?

Death Wish Coffee — a cold-brewed, canned coffee the company touts as "fiercely caffeinated" with a skull and crossbones logo — recalled its 11-ounce cans Sept. 20 because they could possibly contain the deadly toxin botulin. Company founder Mike Brown, 37, said no incidents have been reported, but he is very serious about the safety of his product. "I know our logo and name might not seem like it reflects that," Brown told the Washington Post. Production has been halted.

The farce is strong

A black-and-white photo depicting the signing of the Charter of the United Nations in San Francisco in 1945 has prompted the recall and reprinting of Saudi social studies textbooks because it pictures Saudi King Faisal seated next to the Jedi master Yoda. The photograph was created by 26-year-old Saudi artist Abdullah Al Shehri, who mixes pop culture icons into historic photographs. Shehri told the New York Times he inserted Yoda into the photo because he reminded him of the king. "He was wise and was always strong in his speeches," Shehri said. "I am the one who designed it, but I am not the one who put it in the book." Saudi education minister Ahmed Al-Eissa apologized for the mistake, but the mystery of how the photo got into the book remains unsolved.

Check, please

Octogenarians Ray and Wilma Yoder of Goshen, Ind., have finally achieved a goal they set nearly 40 years ago: to visit every Cracker Barrel in the United States. On Aug. 31, they checked off the last of 645 stops in Tualatin, Ore., where they each received a Four-Star apron, the company's highest honor. The Yoders once stopped at 10 Cracker Barrels in one day. "I've always walked away feeling refreshed," Ray Yoder told ABC News. "For two old people, we're pretty fast-moving."

Mountain hijinks

Police in Cumbria County, England, responded on Sept. 23 to a call for help from 3,210-foot Scafell Pike (England's highest mountain), where four men ran into trouble while hiking. However, their problems didn't stem from dehydration or a painful fall. Instead, it seems the group had become "incapable of walking due to cannabis use," police told the Guardian. A police spokesperson wrote on Facebook: "Now having to deploy rescue, air support and ambulance to rescue them. Words fail us. ... " Cumbria police superintendent Justin Bibby reminded hikers that "alcohol or any other substance that could impair your judgment ... has no place on a mountain."

News of the Weird is compiled by the editors at Andrews McMeel Syndication. Send your weird news items to