1. THE CUCKOO’S CALLING, by Robert Galbraith. (Mullholland Books/Little, Brown.) A detective probes a supermodel’s suicide; by J.K. Rowling, writing pseudonymously.

2. MISTRESS, by James Patterson and David Ellis. (Little, Brown.) When he begins to investigate a friend’s mysterious death, a man discovers that she was leading a double life.

3. INFERNO, by Dan Brown. (Doubleday.) Symbologist Robert Langdon, on the run in Florence, must decipher a series of codes created by a Dante-loving scientist.

4. AND THE MOUNTAINS ECHOED, by Khaled Hosseini. (Riverhead.) A multigenerational family saga centers on a brother and sister born in Afghanistan; from the author of “The Kite Runner.”

5. GONE GIRL, by Gillian Flynn. (Crown.) A woman disappears on her fifth wedding anniversary; is her husband a killer?

6. HOTSHOT, by Julie Garwood. (Dutton.) Surrounded by enemies who want her to fail in the resort business, Peyton Lockhart calls on Finn MacBain, a childhood friend who once saved her life and is now an FBI agent.

7. THE ENGLISH GIRL, by Daniel Silva. (Harper.) Gabriel Allon, an art restorer and occasional spy for the Israeli secret service, steps in to help the British prime minister.

8. THE LAST WITNESS, by W.E.B. Griffin and William E. Butterworth IV. (Putnam.) Philadelphia homicide detective Matt Payne searches for a crucial witness who has gone into hiding; a Badge of Honor novel.

9. THE OCEAN AT THE END OF THE LANE, by Neil Gaiman. (Morrow/HarperCollins.) A middle-aged man recalls his lonely boyhood and his friendship with a remarkable girl.

10. THE COMPANIONS, by R.A. Salvatore. (Wizards of the Coast.) Book 1 of a new fantasy series, “The Sundering.”


1. ZEALOT, by Reza Aslan. (Random House.) A biography of Jesus of Nazareth presents him in the context of his times as the leader of a revolutionary movement.

2. LEAN IN, by Sheryl Sandberg with Nell Scovell. (Knopf.) The chief operating officer of Facebook urges women to pursue their careers without ambivalence.

3. THIS TOWN, by Mark Leibovich. (Blue Rider.) An examination of Washington’s “media-industrial complex” by the chief national correspondent for the New York Times Magazine.

4. INFILTRATED, by Jay W. Richards. (McGraw-Hill Education.) An argument that financial reformers have infiltrated American institutions and are waging war against free enterprise. (b)

5. HAPPY, HAPPY, HAPPY, by Phil Robertson with Mark Schlabach. (Howard Books.) The Duck Commander pays tribute to “faith, family and ducks.”

6. LAWRENCE IN ARABIA, by Scott Anderson. ( Doubleday.) A history of the Arab revolt against the Turks in World War I focuses on T.E. Lawrence and other international adventurers.

7. UNBROKEN, by Laura Hillenbrand. (Random House.) An Olympic runner’s story of survival as a prisoner of the Japanese in World War II after his bomber went down over the Pacific.

8. LET’S EXPLORE DIABETES WITH OWLS, by David Sedaris. (Little, Brown.) Essays from the humorist on subjects like French dentistry and a North Carolina Costco.

9. THE SPORTS GENE, by David Epstein. (Current.) A study of the science of elite athletic performance addresses questions about whether athletic skill is innate or can be learned.

10. THESE FEW PRECIOUS DAYS, by Christopher Andersen. (Gallery Books.) The marriage of Jack and Jacqueline Kennedy, with emphasis on its final year.


1. THE FIVE LOVE LANGUAGES, by Gary Chapman. (Northfield.) How to communicate love in a way a spouse will understand.

2. JERUSALEM, by Yotam Ottolenghi and Sami Tamimi. (Ten Speed Press.) Recipes inspired by the diverse city’s varied, flavorful cuisine.

3. WHEAT BELLY, by William Davis. (Rodale.) An examination of wheat in modern diets and an argument for its elimination.

4. WHAT TO EXPECT WHEN YOU’RE EXPECTING, by Heidi Murkoff and Sharon Mazel. (Workman.) Advice for parents-to-be. (b)

5. LIFE CODE, by Phil McGraw. (Bird Street.) How to “win in the real world,” regardless of people who try to exploit you.

These rankings reflect sales from venues nationwide for the week ending Aug. 10. An (x) indicates that a book’s sales are barely distinguishable from those of the book above. A (b) indicates that some sellers report receiving bulk orders.