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Continued: Common Core standards adopted by some states, rejected, repealed by others as debate continues

  • Article by: THE ASSOCIATED PRESS , Associated Press
  • Last update: September 2, 2014 - 12:35 AM

Mississippi schools are supposed to be fully teaching based on the standards this year, and Mississippi plans to use the PARCC tests for most of its state standardized testing beginning this spring.

Attempts were made earlier this year by some lawmakers to roll back the state's implementation of Common Core, but those proposals failed by wide margins.

But Republican Gov. Phil Bryant has called Common Core a "failed program" and said he expected lawmakers to address the standards in the 2015 legislative session. State Superintendent Carey Wright has pushed back against Bryant, saying his description of Common Core is a "gross mischaracterization" and saying students "deserve the opportunity to perform to higher expectations."

By Jeff Amy.

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MISSOURI

Public schools in Missouri have transitioned to the standards, but a new state law backed by opponents could get rid of them.

In July, Democratic Gov. Jay Nixon signed a measure passed by the Republican-led Legislature that creates task forces of parents and educators to develop new state standards for English, math, science and history to be implemented during the 2016-2017 school year.

By David Lieb.

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MONTANA

Montana students for the first time will take a test linked to the standards. There was a trial of the test last spring.

Office of Public Instruction Superintendent Denise Juneau said some schools are behind in curriculum development, teacher training and acquiring textbooks or other equipment to teach to the new standards. The 2013 Legislature rejected proposals to allocate money for training and equipment, and state Sen. Roger Webb has submitted a bill request for the 2015 session to bar any funding for the standards.

By Matt Volz.

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NEBRASKA

Nebraska has not adopted the standards, and uses state standards developed by teachers, said Betty VanDeventer, a spokeswoman for the state Department of Education. By law, they're reviewed once every five years.

A study commissioned by the department last year found that Nebraska's language arts standards are as tough as those of Common Core and more demanding in some areas. The study said Nebraska's math standards cover most of the national Common Core content. Some material is introduced in later grades, but the study said it's often presented in greater depth.

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