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Continued: Common Core standards adopted by some states, rejected, repealed by others as debate continues

  • Article by: THE ASSOCIATED PRESS , Associated Press
  • Last update: September 2, 2014 - 12:35 AM

South Dakota began to fully implement the standards during the 2013-2014 school year.

A number of bills seeking to scrap the Common Core standards failed during the 2014 Legislature. Lawmakers, however, approved a bill that would delay the adoption of multistate standards in any other subjects until after July 2016. GOP Gov. Dennis Daugaard signed the bill in March.

By Regina Garcia Cano.

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TENNESSEE

During the last Tennessee General Assembly, lawmakers proposed several measures to do away with the state's Common Core standards. All of them failed.

But lawmakers voted to delay the testing associated with Common Core for one year. Republican Gov. Bill Haslam reluctantly signed the measure. He said the standards are needed to better prepare students for college and the workforce and play a role in attempt to raise the state's high school graduation rates from the current 32 percent to 55 percent by the year 2025.

By Lucas L. Johnson II.

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TEXAS

Texas refused to adopt Common Core, instead mandating curriculum standards known as the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills, though as much as two-thirds of the state's math standards are thought to overlap with Common Core requirements.

Conservatives continue to worry about Common Core seeping into Texas classrooms, so much so that the Legislature in 2013 passed a law expressly forbidding school districts from using it as part of lesson plans. Then, in June, Republican Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott, the front-runner in November's governor's race, issued an opinion reiterating that schools using Common Core standards "in any way" would violate that law.

By Will Weissert.

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UTAH

Gov. Gary Herbert, a Republican, has defended the state's Common Core standards, which are generally referred to as Utah Core or Utah Core Standards.

But after protests and swelling complaints from conservative activists, Herbert has asked the state attorney general's office to review the adoption of the standards and to report the level of control Utah and local districts and schools have over curriculum. He also asked education experts to review how well the standards will prepare students for success and established a website where parents and others can leave comments about the standards.

Utah passed a law two years ago that requires the state to abandon any agreements or contracts if Utah's control of standards or curriculum is ceded to the federal government. Earlier this year, the Legislature passed and Herbert signed a measure creating a standards review committee.

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