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Continued: 25 years later, oil still stains Alaskan sound

  • Article by: SEAN COCKERHAM , McClatchy News Service
  • Last update: March 22, 2014 - 8:14 PM

Prince William Sound was home to a lucrative spring herring fishery that supported fishermen badly in need of cash coming off the long winter in between fishing seasons.

Researchers found lesions and larval abnormalities in herring exposed to the oil. Then, four years after the spill, the herring population crashed dramatically. The reasons are a subject of intense debate, with suggestions that the effects of the spill could have made the herring vulnerable to disease.

“No other stock in Alaska crashed in 1993, so that’s indirect evidence it is spill-related,” said Jeep Rice, who studied the spill for more than two decades as a federal scientist. “That’s kind of weak, and yet it is about as good as we can get in terms of explaining why it happened in that year.”

The herring never really recovered, and the current population is too low to overcome predators. Herring fishing, with a brief exception, has been closed for 20 years.

The federal and state governments are still weighing the science of the spill’s effects and deciding whether to seek more money from Exxon Mobil for cleaning up remaining oil.

If there is evidence the spill is causing unexpected, continuing damage, the company could be forced to pay up to $100 million on top of the $900 million civil settlement that Exxon paid in 1991. The case lives on in the courts, where the federal and state governments have said more studies are needed.

  • related content

  • In this April 9, 1989, photo, a local fisherman inspected a dead California gray whale on the northern shore of Latouche Island, Alaska, after the Exxon Valdez oil spill. Oil can still be found in the area.

  • The terminus of the 800-mile trans-Alaska oil pipeline in Valdez, Alaska. The Exxon Valdez loaded at the terminus and ran aground near Bligh Reef in March 1989, spilling nearly 11 million gallons.

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