'King of Gore' discovered in Utah

  • Updated: November 9, 2013 - 4:56 PM

A new species — the equivalent of the great uncle of the ferocious Tyrannosaurus rex — reveals new insights.

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This artist's rendering released by the Natural History Museum of Utah, shows a newly-discovered dinosaur, Lythronax argestes, whose fossils have been found in southern Utah. Paleontologists say this proves giant tyrant dinosaurs like the Tyrannosaurus rex were around 10 million years earlier than previously believed. (AP Photo/Natural History Museum of Utah, Audrey Atuchin)

Photo: AUDREY ATUCHIN • Natural History Museum of Utah via Associated Press,

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Paleontologists unveiled a new dinosaur species that proves giant tyrant dinosaurs like the Tyrannosaurus rex were around 10 million years earlier than previously believed. The species, Lythronax argestes, was 24 feet long and 8 feet tall at the hip, and was covered in scales and feathers. The discovery offers valuable new insight into the evolution of the ferocious tyrannosaurs that have captured the awe of school children and adults alike, said Thomas Holtz Jr., a vertebrate paleontologist at the University of Maryland department of geology.  Asked what the carnivorous dinosaur ate, Mark Loewen, a University of Utah paleontologist,  said: “Whatever it wants.”

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  • Realistic model derived from actual skull bones of a new species of tyrannosaur unearthed in Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument in southern Utah is revealed at the Utah Museum of Natural History Museum in Salt Lake City, Wednesday, Nov. 6, 2013. Paleontologists unveiled a new dinosaur discovered four years ago that proves giant tyrant dinosaurs like the Tyrannosaurus rex were around 10 million years earlier than previously believed. (AP Photo/The Salt Lake Tribune, Al Hartmann)

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