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Continued: In final arguments, prosecutors say Manning's only mission was to spill secrets to WikiLeaks

  • Article by: DAVID DISHNEAU , Associated Press.
  • Last update: July 25, 2013 - 6:15 PM

Coombs said on Friday they would hear what truth sounds like

Manning sat quietly in his blue dress uniform and followed along as the prosecution showed slides, reading them off of monitor on the defense table.

Fein said Manning relied on WikiLeaks and its founder Julian Assange for guidance on what to leak, starting within two weeks of his arrival in Iraq in November 2009.

Referring to a "Most Wanted Leaks" list the organization published, Fein said WikiLeaks sought almost exclusively information about the U.S.

"What is obvious is that Pfc. Manning pulled as much information as possible to please Julian Assange in order to get that information released," Fein said. He later described the group as "a bunch of anti-government activists and anarchists."

Federal authorities also are looking into whether Assange can be prosecuted. He has been holed up in the Ecuadorean Embassy in London to avoid extradition to Sweden on sex-crimes allegations.

Also Thursday, the judge refused to dismiss theft charges against Manning after the defense said prosecutors hadn't proven the allegations.

A counterintelligence witness, in classified testimony, valued the Iraq and Afghanistan war logs at about $5.7 million, based on what foreign intelligence services had paid in the past for similar information, Fein said.

Manning pleaded guilty earlier this year to reduced versions of some charges. He faces up to 20 years in prison for those offenses, but prosecutors pressed ahead with the original charges.

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