Digest this about dinosaurs

By AMINA KHAN May 08, 2012, 08:04 PM

Study of sauropods indicated that their burps and flatulence were a major source of greenhouse gas.

0 Comments

'Great Dying' might yield clues about future

By ALANNA MITCHELL May 05, 2012, 09:41 PM

Painstaking analyses of massive extinction revealed startling clues about marine life.

0 Comments

Science notes: Does short stature help pygmies?

May 05, 2012, 04:55 PM

Scientists who study human evolution have long puzzled over why African Pygmies are so short. It is one of the most visible examples of human diversity, with Pygmy males standing 4-foot-11 on average, while some of their neighboring ethnic groups are tall. Many biologists have assumed there must be some evolutionary advantage to their short stature -- perhaps that they better maneuvered through the forest or they survived on less food.

0 Comments

Hidden clue narrows search for Lost Colony

By JAY PRICE McClatchy Newspapers May 03, 2012, 11:27 PM

After hundreds of years, the mystery of the Roanoke colonists may finally be lifting after a secret symbol was found on ancient map.

0 Comments

Scientists use airship to look for meteorites

May 03, 2012, 08:17 PM

A group of scientists took to the skies in a slow-moving airship Thursday in search of meteorites that rained over California's gold country last month.

0 Comments

TV's double vision, when 1 screen isn't enough

By FRAZIER MOORE May 03, 2012, 08:16 PM

As a kid, I dreamed of having a telephone that was plugged into my family's TV and would let me ring up whoever I was watching. With this special phone, I could reach my favorite TV stars, introduce myself and talk to them about their shows.

0 Comments

Friend or foe, ravens recognize you

April 28, 2012, 04:29 PM

NEW YORK TIMES

0 Comments

Biologists create a new possibility of life - but not as we know it

By FAYE FLAM April 28, 2012, 04:28 PM

Blurring the lines between life and inanimate matter, biologists said they have created six alternatives to DNA and coaxed them to undergo evolution.

0 Comments

A little Hawaii is found on Mars

By AMY HUBBARD April 27, 2012, 09:01 PM

High-res images of lava coils discovered on Mars, are the first extraterrestrial ones ever identified.

0 Comments

Fireball remnants likely in Calif. some of oldest

By SCOTT SONNER April 26, 2012, 03:44 AM

Robert Ward has been hunting and collecting meteorites for more than 20 years so he knew he'd found something special in the Sierra foothills along the path of a flaming fireball that shook parts of Northern California and Nevada with a sonic boom over the weekend.

0 Comments

Asteroids may yield precious metals, cosmic riches

By DONNA BLANKINSHIP and SETH BORENSTEIN April 24, 2012, 06:07 PM

Using space-faring robots to mine precious metals from asteroids almost sounds easy when former astronaut Tom Jones describes it — practically like clearing a snow-covered driveway.

0 Comments

Google launches storage service for personal files

By MICHAEL LIEDTKE April 24, 2012, 05:45 PM

Google is hoping to build the world's largest digital filing cabinet in the latest attempt to deepen people's dependence on its services.

0 Comments

Recent solar bursts well-timed for U space study

By BILL McAULIFFE April 23, 2012, 10:29 PM

Radiation detectors being launched will map zones that imperil spacecraft, disrupt communications.

0 Comments

Bacteria that's built to last - for millions of years

By MELISSA HEALY April 21, 2012, 04:22 PM

Durable strains provide clues about why some are resistant to antibiotics.

0 Comments

It's a long wait if you miss this skywatching event

April 21, 2012, 03:59 PM

Every hundred years or so, the Earth, Venus and the sun queue up in a relatively straight line -- in an event called the transit of Venus -- so that observers on Earth can watch our less-than-habitable sister planet drift across the face of the sun. It takes place in pairs set eight years apart (the last one took place on June 8, 2004; the next will come June 6 this year), but they roll around only once a century or so. In his new book, Nick Lomb, curator of astronomy at Australia's Sydney Observatory, gives the rundown on the event. With the invention of the telescope in the 1600s, the transit of Venus became a hot ticket for astrophiles, who often went to great lengths to check it out. How great? Well, Captain James Cook, for one, sailed across the globe to Tahiti to view it in 1769. By providing a third point of reference, the transit of Venus made it possible for astronomers to measure the distance from Earth to the sun, which unlocked a lot of other data, including the mass of the sun and the other planets. Lacking modern solar filters, observers had to watch the transit by positioning a telescope to project the sun's image onto a piece of paper in a darkened room. There's better equipment available these days. But if you miss Venus's appearance in June, you'll have to wait a while -- until 2117 -- to catch the transit again.

0 Comments

Toddlers and chimps cave to peer pressure

April 21, 2012, 03:58 PM

Many a parent may say that teenagers succumb to peer pressure. A study reports that toddlers and chimpanzees do too -- but orangutans don't seem to follow the crowd.

0 Comments

Can farming save wild seahorses?

By JULIET EILPERIN April 21, 2012, 01:57 PM

Scientists are turning to techniques used to raise fish sold in markets and restaurants.

0 Comments

Polar bear ancestry shrouded in mystery

April 19, 2012, 06:41 PM

Polar bears, long thought to have branched off relatively recently from brown bears, developing their white coats, webbed paws and other adaptations over the past 150,000 years, are not descended from brown bears, scientists report.

0 Comments

Shuttle to offer a farewell show

By BRIAN VASTAG April 15, 2012, 05:39 PM

Before landing at a museum, Discovery may give folks in the D.C. area quite a show.

0 Comments

Meteor shower adds anticipation to Lyrids

April 14, 2012, 04:34 PM

In a few days -- barring cloud cover -- the night skies will present one of the more arresting displays of meteors streaking through space. Known as the Lyrids, the shower of light has appeared in mid-April for about 2,600 years. When the meteors peak before dawn April 22, as many as 100 of them an hour will arc across the sky. Anticipation for the showers was heightened last week after a shooting star lighted up the sky with an impressive bright green light. "I've seen pretty bright meteors ... but nothing like this one," said astronomer Dan Joyce, 64. Of the increased interest in the Lyrids after the impressive meteor shower, Joyce said: "That would be a big plus. Not enough people look at the sky."

0 Comments

Result Per Page

ADVERTISEMENT

Connect with twitterConnect with facebookConnect with Google+Connect with PinterestConnect with PinterestConnect with RssfeedConnect with email newsletters

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT