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Anna Dvorak

Nutrition, wellness consultant

A Big Helping of Love


What is at the heart of your tradition, and what matters when it comes to sharing a Thanksgiving table? For me, it’s being together with friends, family - or both, spending time cooking delicious foods, and eating together - enjoying each other’s company with gratitude.


Even though holidays can push all of our trigger buttons so effectively, by being thrown in the stew of family dynamics, the stress of bringing a huge meal to the table and the digestive toll of eating too much - it can also be differently wonderful. It can be exactly what you want to eat, shared with the people you most want to enjoy.


When six of us sit down to our Thanksgiving dinner tomorrow, for instance, there won’t be a bird, stuffing, mashed potatoes or gravy on the table. Our focus will be on vegetables, cheese and homemade pasta, because that is how I want to love my family this year. All of the vegetables will come from either my fall Hogsback CSA farm share - leeks, onions, garlic, celery root, carrots, squash, thyme, potatoes - or from my parents’ garden - kale, tarragon, rosemary and Brussels sprouts. The other ingredients will come from as close to home as possible, with the exception of a marvelous hunk of Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese that I brought back from a recent trip to Italy, which has inspired our menu.


We’ll start the day with coffee and homemade prune or poppyseed-stuffed kolacky (Czech filled buns) - an annual Czech tradition that my mother bakes the day before. For lunch, we’ll have a bowl of Celery Root Bisque with a batch of hot rolls right out of the oven. They’ll be my mom's famous crescent rolls - tender and buttery, but this year my husband will be learning to make them with her, expanding his knowledge for his new love of baking.


In between breakfast and lunch, my mom and I will spend a few hours in the kitchen - my favorite place to be on any holiday - where we’ll work on prepping the dinner. I’ll be making one of my favorite things that needs to be made with heaps of love: homemade pasta. I’ll be roasting a buttercup squash, and sauteéing onions to make the pasta into Tortelli di Zucca - or squash and parmesan-stuffed ravioli, which we’ll have with a decadent butter and sage sauce. My mom will be working on the sides and her apple-cranberry tart. We’ll take time away from the kitchen to play cards for several hours, make a fancy cocktail or have a little glass of bubbly, and then sit down to eat our ravioli with a lovely salad, sautéed Brussels sprouts with pecans and shallots, Tuscan white beans (recipe in my Nourish: Spring cookbook), and sautéed kale with garlic. It will be simple and perfect for our day.


Next year it will probably be something entirely different all over again. Maybe there will be more tradition on the table, or maybe not. But it will always include the important stuff: food, friends, family and love. What will be on your table?


Celery-Root Bisque 


Prep time: 30 min 

Cooking time: 1 hour 

Yield: 8 to 10 servings


4 tablespoons organic butter (substitute extra olive oil for a dairy allergy), divided

2 tablespoons olive oil 

1 lb celery root (also called celeriac), peeled with a knife or Y peeler, cut into 1/2” pieces

2 large potatoes, cut into 1/2” pieces

3 celery ribs, chopped

2 large leeks, white and pale green parts only, rinsed and chopped

1 medium shallot, chopped (about 1/2 cup)

6 cups vegetable stock - homemade stock or from organic bouillon cubes - OR water

1 teaspoons sea salt 

Freshly ground black pepper

6 ounces cremini mushrooms, very thinly sliced

1 tablespoon minced fresh thyme leaves


Warm a 5-quart heavy pot over moderate heat, then add 2 tablespoons butter and the olive oil along with the celery root, potatoes, celery, leeks and shallots. Stir to coat all of the vegetables in oil, then cook, covered, stirring occasionally, until softened but not browned, about 15 minutes. Add stock, salt, and pepper and simmer, uncovered, until vegetables are very tender, about 30 minutes.


Purée soup with an immersion blender, or cool for 15 minutes and carefully purée in batches in a blender until smooth, then return to pot. Reheat bisque over low heat, stirring occasionally, about 5 minutes. 


While bisque is reheating, warm a 12-inch heavy skillet over moderately high heat, then add the butter and mushrooms and sauté, stirring the mushrooms until crispy golden brown, about 5 minutes. Season with salt and pepper, then transfer mushrooms to a plate.


Serve bisque topped with mushrooms and a garnish of minced thyme leaves.

The Story of Making a Book - and Cooking a Recipe


This morning tells a story of what it is to have a very large goal, a team of cheerleaders, and the support of those who believe in you.


For years, I’ve written down and assembled my recipes to share with friends who were making a shift in their food journey to eat healthier and feel better. For the past several years, I have been creating even more recipes and dedicating a large part of my time to crafting more foods at both ends of the health spectrum - both hyper-conscious of food allergies and intolerances - and absolutely delicious with no room for apologies.


The story of how sending recipes to friends turned into creating four full cookbooks that make up an entire year of seasonal, local, organic and healthy eating starts with being asked if I was ever going write a book at monthly cooking classes that I teach at Kitchen Window in Minneapolis. Over and over and over again. I finally got good and tired of saying that I was “working on it” and actually started to work on it. It began with a plan to gather all of these recipes, and then ended with it being too big and too much to do for one book. 


So I restarted with the idea to break it down, and to write and publish just exactly how I live my life - season by season, cooking and eating with beautiful ingredients that are sourced by the prime of their flavor from local growers. 


Next, I kept saying that I didn’t want to do a “cooking for kids” cookbook, even though I kept hearing from families that they wanted just that. 


So what I ended up doing was creating a healthy cooking series for families - or anyone who want to eat better - while managing food allergies and intolerances in the kitchen. I used my healthful recipes with the all-natural substitutions that are a mainstay in my own kitchen.


And I did it because I had a huge team of help. My team was a group of over 15 women - most of them moms, including my own mom - and two men - both dads. They worked with me for over a year, cooking and testing recipes, serving them to their families and giving me real feedback on what worked and what didn’t. And guess who was eating the food? Kids. Not food that was dumbed down, breaded, flavorless or fried - but real food with whole ingredients and good flavors. Every single recipe was vetted and tested by real families.


The families of my testers are like so many other families out there, who are learning what it means to cook with healthy fats, whole gluten-free grains, colorful vegetables, and without dairy or refined sugar. Families who are learning how to cook more and stock the refrigerator with batches of healthy foods to make busy lives and nutritious eating both possible and delicious.


So the story this morning is that the seasons have come full circle, and I've been humbled in the process. The writing and recipe testing for Nourish: Winter began last September, and I complete the series today with Nourish: Fall, live on Amazon. It’s a huge project completed and at the same time - just the beginning. Cheers - to more good food and healthy living!


Sweet Potato and Anasazi Bean Stew 

(from Nourish: Fall by Anna Dvorak)


Anasazi beans are beautiful when dry - speckled white and deep red - and have a sweet flavor and creamy, rich texture when cooked. They have a thin, tender skin which makes them easier to digest than some beans. Native to the desert high mountain regions of the southwest, they cook remarkably well at altitude, which isn’t the case for all beans. Outside of their native region they can be hard to find, so substitute pinto beans instead, which are also a very creamy and meaty bean. Serve this colorful, satisfying stew with a large green salad, and consider doubling it to have great leftovers for lunches or dinners.


Prep time: 15 minutes

Cooking time: 45 minutes

Yield: 4 servings

Gluten-free, Dairy-free


2 cups cooked Anasazi beans or pinto beans (or use 1 (14 ounce) can beans, drained and rinsed)

2 tablespoons olive oil

1 small onion, diced

5 cloves garlic, minced

1 small sweet potato, scrubbed and cut into 1/2” dice (or 1/2 small winter squash) (about 1 1/4 cups)

1 small Yukon Gold potato, scrubbed and cut into 1/2” dice (about 1 cup)

3 cups water

1/4 teaspoon sea salt

1/2 teaspoon oregano

1/2 teaspoon thyme

1/4 cup frozen sweet corn

1 teaspoon coconut oil or olive oil

2 Roma tomatoes, fresh or canned, chopped

2 tablespoons fresh cilantro, chopped

Sea salt

Freshly ground black pepper


1. Prepare beans if cooking from scratch. (See full recipe for beans in Nourish: Fall.)


2. Meanwhile, warm a small soup pot over medium heat. Add olive oil and onions and sauté until onions begin to soften and turn translucent, about 5 minutes. Add garlic, stir and let cook for an additional 3-5 minutes. Add cubed sweet potato and Yukon Gold potato, stir to coat in oil and add 3 cups water along with sea salt, oregano and thyme. Increase heat to medium high; when the mixture comes to a boil, reduce heat to medium low and let cook at a gentle simmer for 25 minutes.  


3. While the soup is simmering, warm a small sauté pan over medium heat until hot. Add coconut oil and corn and sauté until the corn begins to turn golden brown. Add corn to the soup pot along with chopped tomatoes and cooked beans and let the mixture simmer for an additional 10-15 minutes. Add 1 cup bean cooking water if needed to thin the stew.


4. Taste for salt and adjust. Stir in fresh cilantro and black pepper to taste and serve.

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