Anna Dvorak

Anna Dvorak is a personal guide for living a vibrantly healthy life. Dvorak teaches at the Wedge Co-op and other Minneapolis/St. Paul metro area co-ops, at Kitchen Window, and leads weekend and weeklong retreats focused on mindful, balanced living. She teaches how healthier choices can be attainable for our skin, home environment and bodies through natural products, organic ingredients, and balanced living. Read more about Anna Dvorak.

Posts about Food and drink

Forget the grocery store

Posted by: Anna Dvorak Updated: August 9, 2012 - 8:03 PM

 

 

There are so many ways to get access to some of the spectacular foods in season at the peak of summer, which is right now. Maybe you’re lucky enough to be able to walk into your garden and pick what you need for dinner. Maybe tonight’s the night you pick up your CSA share to bring home and unpack. Or maybe you’ll visit a local farmer’s market this week or weekend (see photo above).

If there ever was a season to change up the shopping routine, this is definitely it. I cook and eat seasonally - it’s how I was raised - so this time of year I skip the usual suspects that are “year round” foods - the bananas, the spinach, the celery and the waxy cucumbers.  This is the season when I do the bulk of my “shopping” from my CSA share, the farmer’s market and my little herb garden. 

That means right now I am eating Colorado peaches, loving the white nectarines and the apricots, and making a weekly splurge on a carton of fresh blueberries. I can’t get enough of the perfectly ripe tomatoes - my latest favorites are Sungold cherry tomatoes - and I love the thin skinned “pickling” cucumbers, which taste so much more like a cucumber than those boomerangs from Mexico ever will. I get the freshest sweet corn I can find at the Saturday market - picked that same morning - and I eat it until I’m totally sick of it.  But I’m not there yet.

The best of the season is still rolling in and I’ll happily avoid the grocery store as long as possible, only stopping for fruit and extras when needed. While I can, I’ll be grilling eggplant and peppers; throwing kale, chard, cukes, cabbage and mint into my green juices, and eating fruit so good I’ll want to cry.  I’m freezing sweet corn and soup stock for winter, and brining pickles to eat daily from the crock. In a few weeks it will be time to can tomato sauce, make pesto and dry herbs.  (I’ll be teaching a two-part Preserving, Canning and Freezing class next month if you’ve been wanting to try any of this).

So how will you enjoy these wonderful foods?

 


Summer Scramble

2 teaspoons coconut oil, butter or olive oil
3 organic eggs
1/2 small red onion, peeled and thinly sliced
1-2 cloves garlic, peeled and sliced
big handful kale, stems removed and roughly chopped
1 little yellow summer squash, halved lengthwise and sliced into half-moons
8 cherry tomatoes, halved
several leaves of fresh basil, roughly chopped
small handful fresh parsley, roughly chopped
salt and freshly ground pepper
1 oz chevre, crumbled into large (1/2”) pieces (preferably from Singing Hills Goat Dairy)

Heat a large, heavy skillet or cast-iron skillet over medium heat.  Add oil, onions, garlic, kale and squash when warm and sauté until golden, about 4 minutes. Crack eggs over kale mixture and let cook for a few minutes, then toss to scramble. Season with salt and turn eggs one more time. Remove to two plates, season with pepper, sprinkle with chopped tomatoes and herbs and dot with chevre.  (Cheese is optional - there is really a ton of flavor in here already). Serve immediately.

 

Serves 2

Mill City Farmers Market: A Love Story

Posted by: Anna Dvorak Updated: June 30, 2012 - 12:04 AM

I have lots of opinions about food. Things I love, things I wouldn’t touch, and things I want everyone to go out and enjoy, right now.

One of my very favorite things is the Mill City Farmer’s Market in downtown Minneapolis. Tucked behind the Mill Ruins along the Mississippi River, Mill City Farmer’s Market is what I’ve come to consider the jewel in the crown of metro area farmer’s markets. Of course I know that everyone has their favorites, but this happens to be mine. Here’s why:

1. I love the quality of food I can find there: the Market has chosen vendors who meet the highest standards of local and sustainably grown, pesticide-free and/or organic foods, plus quality goods.

2. I adore Brenda Langton. With her rich history in the metro food scene serving some of the most honest and responsibly-sourced food from early St. Paul days to Cafe Brenda and now Spoonriver, she has created an amazing food zone at the Market with passion, vision, and a whole lot of work. Mill City Market has become the new standard for organic, quality and innovative local market vendors in large part to her energy and commitment.

3. I love the variety: greens, cheeses, breads and pastries, handmade chocolates and crackers, herbs, wild-caught salmon, and perfect ice cream. I can shop here on Saturdays and stock my fridge for days.

Here are some of my very favorites:

Spinach, kale, arugula and anything else I can get my hands on from Burning River Farm. Based in Frederic, Wisconsin, Mike Noreen runs a modestly-sized CSA with patient, attentive care, which shows in the ultra-fresh, super sweet greens he brings to market every Saturday.

Kiss My Cabbage
: hand-crafted, super-fresh sauerkraut and kimchee in delicious, unexpected and addictive flavors. This will be the jar that makes your fork a divining rod for good health. The über-probiotic.

Stone’s Throw Urban Farm
. I love these guys. They have transformed the soil in various lots throughout south Minneapolis (and St. Paul) into rich, edible mini-fields of green goodness. My favorite place to get bulk mixed salad greens, sprinkled with spicy green flavors and edible flowers. 



Singing Hills Goat Dairy. A farm near Nerstrand, MN and a cheesemaker who makes The Best Feta. Ever. I love the plain feta, but they have several more varieties, plus chevre. Seriously, do not leave the market without taking some home to top your Greek spinach salad.

Sheep’s milk cheeses for the cheese board from Shepherd’s Way Farm. My favorite is the simple, delicious Shepherd’s Hope cheese, and the soft-ripened Camembert style Hidden Falls, which is perfect alongside pretty much anything, even if it’s just straight off the knife.

I’ve never made homemade pasta that tasted so good as when I used the durum wheat blended with spelt from Sunrise Flour Mill. They bring wheat, durum wheat, corn, spelt, rye, and oats, ground in small batches (or left in whole grains for you to grind your own) to market every weekend for baking, polenta-making and for the flaked oats that will beat the pants off your typical oatmeal for breakfast any day.

Of course there are so many more wonderful vendors; Swede Lake Farms for garlic and herbs; Sonny's Ice Cream for small-batch ice creams and sorbets (my recent favorite: Prosecco Lime Sorbet); and Jeanne Beatrice ~ where I bought my handwoven market basket to bring it all home, plus so many more that I haven't mentioned.

But go, find more gems for yourself, and make sure to buy lots of fresh veggies so you can go home and put together a super-local and delicious summer meal that doesn’t take more than a little tossing in a salad bowl.

(P.S. I would be a big liar if I didn't mention that I get a bag of organic, cardamom-spiced mini donuts from the Chef Shack at least once a summer for utter donut perfection. Just make sure to eat extra salad later to make up for it.)

Super Simple Spinach Greek Salad for Two

two large handfuls fresh spinach (about 4 loose cups)
1/2 cup chopped tomatoes
10 Kalamata olives
1/4 red onion, extremely thinly sliced
2 ounces Singing Hills Goat Dairy feta
2 tablespoons best-quality extra-virgin olive oil
juice from 1/2 fresh lemon
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
large pinch sea salt
freshly ground black pepper

Wash and spin dry the spinach. Tear into bite-sized pieces into a medium bowl. Top with tomatoes, olives, onion, and feta. Drizzle with the olive oil, lemon and sprinkle on the oregano, salt and black pepper. Toss well to combine and serve immediately.

What’s that in my CSA box (or, What is a Collard Green)?

Posted by: Anna Dvorak Updated: June 22, 2012 - 4:17 PM

Every once in a while, you meet a vegetable and just draw a blank. No ideas ~ you can’t imagine what it will taste like or how you can use it. It might happen on the afternoon when you open your CSA (community supported agriculture) share and find a broad, fan-shaped green leaf that looks more suited to shading one’s self from the sun (collard greens), or it might be an ungainly handful of squirrely green stalks (garlic scapes) that you find at the farmer's market. Or it could be a couple of big white knobs that kind of hang out at the bottom of the CSA box, looking lost and more useful for batting practice (kohlrabi).

Here’s my suggestion: try eating them. The why is obvious, right? They’re all incredibly good for you. Collard greens are one of the very best vegetable sources of calcium, protein, and vitamins A, K, B6 and folate. When you remove the stem, they’re incredibly sweet tasting raw, which makes them a great tool for wraps - stuffed with hummus, avocado, cucumbers and red peppers. They’re equally delicious cooked: try braising them (again, cut off the center rib) in a little olive oil, water, red pepper flakes, salt and pepper, slowly, for about 45 minutes. Add some smoked turkey to make this even more traditional and to add a smoky flavor.

What about those ungainly garlic scapes? Trimmed off of springtime garlic, they are great tasting - like mild garlic - and like all allium family members, a useful cancer preventative. Use them interchangeably with garlic or scallions: slice them thinly (once you get them under control) and toss them into scrambled eggs, stir-fried vegetables or fried rice, or make them into a delicious pesto.

And lastly, those lovable kohlrabi. Use them just like you would a radish or jicamas: just peel the tough outer skin and thinly slice to use as a vegetable dipper for guacamole or hummus, chop up and throw into that stir-fried vegetable rice, or spritz with lime juice and add right into your salad. Kohlrabi are a part of the notoriously good-for-you group of vegetables called crucifers - rockstars in the antioxident world - protecting us from cancer, contributing to a healthy cardiovascular system, and just generally boosting our immunity.

So, get down to the bottom of the box, and enjoy!

Garlic Scape-Tarragon Pesto

large handful garlic scapes, rinsed and chopped (about 1 cup)
juice of 1/2 lemon
2 tablespoons tarragon, roughly chopped
1/2 teaspoon sea salt
1/4 cup pine nuts, walnuts or almonds
1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil
1/4 cup Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese, shredded ~ optional
freshly ground black pepper

Add the chopped garlic scapes to the bowl of a food processor along with tarragon, sea salt and pine nuts. Pulse several times until it becomes finely chopped. Add the olive oil and purée for 30 seconds or until it becomes a nicely blended sauce. Add cheese (if using) and pulse to combine. Finish by tasting for salt and adding more if necessary and adding several grindings of black pepper.

Use to fill omelets, spread on bruschetta, toss with freshly boiled new potatoes or served with grilled fish.

Makes about 1 1/2 cups

Spinach is for (Locavore) Lovers

Posted by: Anna Dvorak Updated: April 7, 2012 - 6:26 PM

Spinach has dominated my day so far - in a good way. A few of us talked about it during class this morning at Alotapilates; we bought some from an overflowing box just picked and delivered from the Hjele farm to Local D’Lish this morning which we ate as a salad with brunch; and it will be on our table tomorrow at lunch, wilted and stuffed into crepes with sautéed cremini mushrooms and a little bit of locally made havarti from Morning Star Farm in Cokato, MN.

Spinach is an easy entry into eating dark leafy green vegetables since it is mild tasting and delicious, whether served raw or lightly cooked. In the spring, it is usually one of the first local greens to make an appearance at the markets since it prefers cool growing conditions and doesn't mind spring rains. 

For being so delicate, spinach packs a big nutritional punch: it is extremely high in vitamins A, K, C folic acid and B2, as well as the minerals manganese, magnesium, calcium (yes, really!) and iron. Spinach is also loaded with antioxident-rich phytochemicals that are especially good for eye health - age related macular degeneration in particular and cancer protection, especially stomach, skin and breast cancers.

In order to get the most nutritional benefit out of your beautiful, local spinach, eat it both raw and cooked to maximize vitamin absorption and phytochemical benefits (raw to get the vitamins, minerals and enzymes; cooked to get the phytochemicals).  Either way, be sure to prepare it with a good healthy fat, such as cold-pressed extra-virgin olive oil and raw almonds or walnuts in a salad, or by cooking it in a little coconut oil or organic butter to access the fat-soluble nutrients. 

Buy fresh spinach when it looks bright green and fresh; store it loosely packed in a sealed plastic bag in the refrigerator where it should last for about four days.  Wash fresh spinach by swishing in a bowl of cold water to removed trapped sand particles and dry in salad spinner or by wrapping in clean cotton towel and refrigerated until ready to use that day.

Visit Mark Bittman’s article from last week’s NYTimes Magazine to find a whole matrix of recipes for eating cooked spinach, or try this salad below which totally simple and truly delicious.

Spinach Salad with Grapefruit, Avocado and Walnuts

Four large handfuls (about 8 loose cups) of fresh organic spinach (tender stems are fine to include), washed and dried
2 tablespoons top quality extra-virgin olive oil
1/4 wedge of a fresh organic lemon
sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
1 ripe avocado, pitted and flesh cubed into 1/2” pieces
1 ruby red grapefruit, peeled and sections cut into bite-sized pieces, preferably organic
1/2 cup walnuts (halves or pieces, preferably raw but toasted if you like. Can substitute raw pecans or almonds.)

Place spinach leaves in a large bowl; drizzle with olive oil, squeeze the fresh lemon juice all over and sprinkle a large pinch sea salt evenly on top (about 1/4 teaspoon). Add a generous grinding of black pepper. Toss well to evenly coat the spinach leaves, then top with the avocado pieces and grapefruit chunks, sprinkle with the walnuts and serve.

Serves 4

The Little Sunchoke That Could

Posted by: Anna Dvorak Updated: March 20, 2012 - 4:23 PM

Ever heard of a sunchoke? You’re not alone if you haven’t: it’s not a common vegetable for many of us, but it’s a vegetable that is worth finding it’s way into our diet.

Also known as a Jerusalem artichoke, sunchokes are the tuberous root of the sunchoke plant, a relative of sunflowers. Sunchokes are knobby and misshapen, with a papery skin and flesh the texture of a radish when eaten raw, and creamy like a potato when cooked.

So why bother learning about this funny little tuber and consider adding it into your diet? Gut health. Our digestive systems need all the help they can get from foods that contribute to a finely operating gut, especially if we have trouble with blood sugar imbalance, have received antibiotic treatment, or suffer from digestive distress including stomach upset or IBS, Crohn's or colitis. Jerusalem artichokes - like other inulin-rich sources such as chicory root (most often consumed as an herbal tea or coffee substitute), asparagus, artichokes, dandelion root, onions and garlic - can help.

Inulin is a carbohydrate that acts as a soluble dietary fiber: whole foods inulin sources are considered natural prebiotics, which help establish a healthy intestinal environment by stimulating the growth of beneficial intestinal bacteria.  A healthy intestinal environment prepares us to access the benefits of probiotic foods such as unsweetened yogurt and kefir, unpasteurized sauerkraut, kimchee, miso and other fermented foods that contain beneficial bacteria.

So if you’re willing to give a sunchoke a try, there are very simple ways to get them into your diet. Buy a small amount, scrub them well with a vegetable brush, and slice them thinly to eat them raw with a healthy dip like hummus or white bean dip, or substitute them where canned water chestnuts are typically called for.  To cook, clean them the same way, then slice them into 1/4” crosswise pieces, cover with salted water and gently boil until tender. Then mash with a little olive oil, salt and pepper and eat as a vegetable side with your dinner. (You could also go half and half with potatoes on that one).  To roast, prep them as above, then toss with coconut oil, salt and pepper and roast for 30 minutes - alone or as part of a big pan of roasted vegetables - until tender and caramelized.

Or try this simple soup, put together in 10 minutes with a few other basic ingredients and simmered for less than an hour.

Jerusalem Artichoke (Sunchoke) Soup

2 medium leeks, white parts and pale green parts only (save dark greens of leeks for soup stock)
3-5 garlic cloves, peeled and chopped
2 tablespoons coconut oil or olive oil
1 bulb fennel, rinsed, tops removed and bulb sliced crosswise (optional)
1 lb Jerusalem Artichokes (sunchokes); scrubbed, quartered the long way and sliced into 1/8” pieces
1 teaspoon sea salt
1 teaspoon oregano, crushed
1 teaspoon cumin
pinch red pepper flakes
2 small branches rosemary (optional)
2 bay leaves
filtered water to cover by 1 inch
freshly ground black pepper

Heat a medium soup pot over medium heat. When it is warm to the touch, add the coconut oil, leeks and garlic and sauté until softened but not brown, about 5 minutes.  Add the fennel (if using) and Jerusalem Artichokes and continue to sauté about 5 minutes longer.  Season with the salt, oregano and cumin, add the rosemary and bay leaves, and cover by 1 inch with filtered water.  Increase heat to bring to a boil; reduce heat to medium low and simmer for 40 minutes or until vegetables are tender.  Add salt, if necessary, season with freshly ground black pepper and serve. 

* Add cooked wild rice for a more substantial soup. Purée in a blender for a smooth soup. 

Super Citrus

Posted by: Anna Dvorak Updated: March 3, 2012 - 4:50 PM

This is the time of year when thinking about fresh local foods in Minnesota can be a little dismal, so I’m going in the other direction and embracing citrus from the southern US - and WOW - are they glorious right now.

Murcott tangerines, pixie tangerines, ruby red grapefruit, Meyer lemons, Cara Cara oranges, Valencia and navel oranges: all juicy and delicious, all very opposite of a grey Minnesota day. 
 
Citrus fruits are a fantastic way to get your daily Vitamin C, and are an excellent source of flavonoids as well as B vitamins, carotenes, pectin and potassium. When we eat the whole citrus fruit - which is much preferable to drinking the fruit in a juice version, we’re getting a good source of fiber, too. Even the membranes surrounding the juicy flesh as well as the pith (the pale white inner peel) are loaded with good things for us:  it’s where the highest concentration of flavonoids are located, which are plant-based compounds that provide a broad array of antioxident and positive biochemical benefits.  Flavonoids work in conjunction with Vitamin C, an antioxident vitamin that is essential for tissue growth and repair, maintaining the immune system, keeping our skin, joints, gums and connective tissues healthy, and contributing to our overall health, especially in times of stress.

It doesn’t really seem like an accident that citrus fruits hold so much allure in the winter - and not just because of their vitamin content. How about the vibrant colors and that incredible aroma released when you peel or cut into the skin of an orange? Doesn’t it just make you think of sunshine and positive thoughts? In fact, the essential oil of sweet orange and other citrus is proven to improve mood and decrease anxiety, and is finding widespread use in palliative care programs in mainstream medical institutions, including the Penny George Institute at Abbott Northwestern Hospital here in Minneapolis.

When you’re buying citrus, pick the fruits that have a sweet fragrance and seem heavy for their size, which is the best measure of a juicy, sweet insides instead of dried out flesh.  Opt for organic whenever possible - citrus fruits are one of the most heavily sprayed fruit crops - especially if you plan on using the zest, or the brightly colored outer skin. Pesticide residues on conventional oranges can transfer to the flesh when cutting or peeling, and the peel can contain artificial orange color, Citrus Red No. 2 which is a possible carcinogenic and can cause allergic reactions.

Whether it’s an orange, grapefruit, tangerine or mandarin, make sure to enjoy plenty of citrus this season - in the year of Tangerine (as determined by Pantone, the color experts) - to stay healthy, look young, and to feel better all the way around!

An organic tangerine

An organic tangerine

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