Ernest Comer III

Ernest Comer III is a community relations professional with several years of experience working with non-profit organizations. He has a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Minnesota in Communication Studies with an emphasis in African and African American Studies. Ernest is a proud member of Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Incorporated and has held positions of leadership in organizations such as PRISM at the University of Minnesota, and emerging non-profit in Ramsey County, Re-Armor Homes. He has been an adolescent mentor in the Pediatrics Department at the U and has hosted local television and radio shows showcasing young talent.

Tragic Selflessness

Posted by: Ernest Comer III Updated: March 9, 2014 - 12:53 PM

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We'll start off with our "highs and lows" and get into some important societal survival skills and general goings on of the TwinCities and neighboring communities with news about the rest of the world here and there. Participation is simple. Just give us your highs and lows either in the comments of the article or on twitter by trending #ProverbialWisdoms or tweeting to me @E_HowardCo.

High: New apartment, new office & new beginnigs!
Low: The worst winter weather EVER.

***Tragic Selflessness***

Tragic selflessness occurs in circumstances when our willingness to be of service, or  of assistance to others extends beyond reasonable compassion and personal  capacity. I have spent years of my life neglecting personal care in an effort to be a reliable friend and have a positive impact on people. Larry Smith in a presentation called: Why you will fail to have a great career talked about the fallacy in proclaiming values of being a great friend, spouse or parent and an unwillingness to sacrifice those commitments on the “alter of great accomplishment”. The practice of great personal sacrifice in efforts to appease others is socially, emotionally and often physically destructive. In order to live a healthier life each person needs to care for and uplift self before they can effectively be a resource to others. This is why when the flight attendants describe how to use emergency equipment on the plane they always explain that everyone who can should correctly place an oxygen mask on themselves before helping anyone else. Imagine a hero in a movie walking up and down the aisles of a plane as it falls to the ground helping everyone else correctly place their oxygen masks. As he’s helping a small child, systems fail and the oxygen levels on the plane drop instantly. The hero passes out landing on the child. Both your hero and the child being helped never make it off the plane. This kind of story, I call Tragic  Selflessness and too often there are those who experience the painful and sometimes fatal consequences. I hope this message  finds  you and encourages  you to shift the way that you contribute to the people and missions that you serve.

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