Pigs nabbed in N. Mpls. bound for Indiana

  • Article by: PAUL WALSH , Star Tribune
  • Updated: October 10, 2013 - 7:15 AM
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Andy, left, and Annie at their temporary foster home in Andover.

Photo: Provided by Chicken Run Rescue shelter and sanctuary,

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Hey, about those two farm pigs caught running loose a few weeks ago in north Minneapolis: Andy and Annie are now in temporary digs in Andover and will be turned over in a secret rendezvous before their eventual life of leisure at a farm sanctuary in southern Indiana.

The little oinkers were corralled by authorities during the morning of Sept. 27 in the 2300 block of Emerson Avenue N. after a pursuit of several minutes.

They were put in the custody of the city’s Animal Care and Control agent, then turned over Saturday to the Chicken Run Ranch shelter and sanctuary in north Minneapolis. With no claim of ownership, shelter owner Mary Britton Clouse has the fast-growing pair destined for their eventual home — a farm sanctuary in Salem, Ind.

For now, Andy and Annie are in temporary foster care on a hobby farm in Andover, taken in by a couple who have adopted several potbelly pigs, the type more conducive to being a domestic pet. Andy and Annie have no future as citified pets, Britton Clouse said, because “they have been genetically manufactured to grow to an enormous size. We are working quickly here. They will get large, 400 pounds or more.”

Once all the paperwork is filled out and microchips embedded, the two pigs will be loaded into large dog kennels and driven to an undisclosed location in northern Illinois — the parking lot of a big-box retailer — where they will be handed off to finish the rest of their 715-mile odyssey.

Britton Clouse said her facility deals with lost or abandoned farm animals “all the time. We’ve placed goats, full-grown sheep. … People bring them into the city.”

As for where Andy and Annie came from when they were first picked up in north Minneapolis, neither city officials nor Britton Clouse have an answer.

“I suspect they were going to be slaughtered in somebody’s back yard and they got loose,” she said.

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