This blog covers everything except sports and gardening, unless we find a really good link about using dead professional bowlers for mulch. The author is a StarTribune columnist, has been passing off fiction and hyperbole as insight since 1997, has run his own website since the Jurassic era of AOL, and was online when today’s college sophomores were a year away from being born. So get off his lawn.

Every player's daughter gets a pony, too

Posted by: James Lileks under Minnesota Parks, Photos, Praise Updated: June 9, 2014 - 12:19 PM

#superbowldemands is the official hashtag of people who are heaping amused ridicule and contempt on the NFL’s 158 page lists of requirements. Start here. 

In related news, the paper reported that the Yard, which is what we’re calling the park next to the Stadium, is sorta-kinda public. Most of the time you’ll be able to go there. Eighty days out of the year, it’’ll be devoted to sports events. So it’s not a public park, then. So we shouldn’t have to pay for it. Or at least for the 80s days. Seems simple. 

Think that’s how it’ll work out?

HISTORY What job would you have had in the Middle Ages? would be the Buzzfeedy formulation of this story.

A unique source from 15th century Germany gives us some beautiful images of medieval people at work. Known the House Books of the Nuremberg Twelve Brothers Foundation, these were records of a charitable foundation started in the city of Nuremberg in 1388. The foundation would take 12 poor and needy people and provide them with training in a trade.

Starting around 1425 their books would contain one-page illustration of the people they had helped, usually giving their name and what profession they were in.

A detail:

We even know his name: Hans Lengenfelder. The page has 20 examples; the entire book is here. A remarkable resource. But if your taste in art leans more towards the feline, here you go: Mastepieces of painting improved by adding a “fat ginger cat.” This is perfect:

Svetlana Petrova & Zarathustra the Cat FatCatArt) Via Metro.

ADVERTISING Creepy-crawly ad that stresses the importance of frogs, in case you wondered:

Thing is, the ad suggests we will become quite comfortable with the eventual situation.

Votd A metaphor for Monday:

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