This blog covers everything except sports and gardening, unless we find a really good link about using dead professional bowlers for mulch. The author is a StarTribune columnist, has been passing off fiction and hyperbole as insight since 1997, has run his own website since the Jurassic era of AOL, and was online when today’s college sophomores were a year away from being born. So get off his lawn.

Why Spock Looked At You

Posted by: James Lileks under Gripes, Praise, Technology Updated: April 4, 2014 - 12:23 PM

C'mon. It always snows in April. We think it shouldn't, but it does. It'll be gone soon. We need the moisture. It's good for the crops. Also, kill me now. 

SUGAR PSYCH There’s a reason cereal boxes look like they do, and are placed where they’re placed:

Cereal makers aren't throwing mascots on their boxes for fun. It's to create a psychological connection between a shopper and that box of dehydrated fruits and wheat flakes. But in the case of children's cereals, this four-foot stare is actually aimed at a much lower focal point. Cornell's researchers found that the eyes of spokescharacters on cereal boxes marketed to kids were aimed downward at a 9.6 degree angle; characters on adult boxes tended, on the other hand, to look straight ahead.

Because they make eye contact with kids, tots want them. However: kids have no money, and can’t buy them. They can only ask, and learn the meaning of “no.” As in “No matter how much you beg. No.”

Article title: “How cereal boxes are designed to hypnotize you.” By “you” they mean someone else, and by “hypnotize” they mean “make a commercial pitch to which you may, or may not, respond.” Otherwise it’s utterly accurate. This article concludes:

Creating spokes-characters who make eye contact with a product’s target audience (child or adult) is a package design that can be used as an advertising tool that influences people to buy and develop brand loyalty. (A) key take-away from this study are:

If you are a parent who does not want your kids to go “cuckoo for Cocoa Puffs” avoid taking them down the cereal aisle.

Thanks; that first one wouldn’t have occurred to anyone. Makes sense now when you think about it, though. The articles seem to suggest there's something nefarious about all this, but imagine what they'd right if all the mascots were looking away from you into the distance with neutral expressions. WHAT EXISTENTIAL DREAD  IS LUCKY THE LEPRECHAUN SEEING THAT WE CANNOT? and that sort of thing. 

SCIENCE! Nothing to fear except fear itself, and the explosion of the sun: Here are 150 things top scientists are worried about.

That we will continue to uphold taboos on bad words. –Benhamin Bergen, Associate Professor of Cognitive Science, UCS

Cultural extinction, and the fact that the works of an obscure writer from the Caribbean may not get enough attention. –Hans Ulrich Obrist. curator, Serptine Gallery

So a really smart guy is concerned that the F word may not appear on billboards. Okay. I worry about the sentient life under the ocean discovered under Endeladus. Unless it’s really cute. If it’s cute then people will demand we send humans with cameras because totes adorbs. to use words Gawker has now banned.

PASS GO Update on the call for new Monopoly rules: here are the top five.

The winning house rule for landing on Go means players get 400 Monopoly dollars instead of the official 200. As for Free Parking, official rules call for absolutely nothing to happen when a player lands there. Under the house rule, any taxes and fees collected are thrown into the middle for a lucky someone who lands on that corner square.

Rounding out the five winners are players must travel around the board one full time before they can begin buying properties, and collecting 500 bucks for rolling double ones.

That’s four.

You have to read elsewhere in the piece to discover the fifth: you can’t collect rent while you’re in jail. You know, 

Amusing comment on the Strib site:

I was surprised to see one house rule not make the cut. . . One player declares moratorium and no houses can be built on another players property. The are variations to the rule; no mixed use of hotels and houses, no unequal amounts of houses on adjoining properties, etc. . . I guess that rule is only popular in certain geographic regions.

+1

VotD Do you think this is real? 

Daily Dot says: "It’s so perfect, it makes me suspect that what happens here is not purely an accident. Actually, it’s almost definitely a fake.” Well. The title might be the clue; an ad popped for ADT Security Systems while I was watching, but that could be SEO Google-fu. As for the account: New channel made yesterday; one video; no avatar.

Give it a week and we'll find it's "viral marketing" by a security firm. 

ADVERTISEMENT

Connect with twitterConnect with facebookConnect with Google+Connect with PinterestConnect with PinterestConnect with RssfeedConnect with email newsletters

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT