This blog covers everything except sports and gardening, unless we find a really good link about using dead professional bowlers for mulch. The author is a StarTribune columnist, has been passing off fiction and hyperbole as insight since 1997, has run his own website since the Jurassic era of AOL, and was online when today’s college sophomores were a year away from being born. So get off his lawn.

While we wait for the snow . . .

Posted by: James Lileks under Architecture, Minnesota History, Praise Updated: April 3, 2014 - 12:09 PM

A bit of Minneapolis history revealed: let’s all goggle at an old exposed brick wall!

It’s part of this 510 Marquette, which suffered the worst modernization of any building in Minneapolis.

It’s the interior wall, not the old exterior. All the classical details were scraped off and disposed here and there; two of the columns ended up at the MoZaic’s art park. Where they were before I can’t possibly imagine.

It was a Cass Gilbert building, the first Federal Reserve. Even before they plopped a tower atop the building, it was a forbidding thing.

From the newspaper the week it opened: Not even the Beagle Boys dared crack it!

Can’t find any pictures of what it’ll look like when it’s finished. It can’t be worse.

BTW: A commenter on the UrbanMSP forum makes an interesting suggestion:

If the Strib moved in, they could re-clad the first few floors of this with the exterior of the old Strib Building. I think it would actually match up fairly well.

That would be . . . unnerving.

MOVIES About that painting in “Grand Budapest Hotel”: there’s a reason art history majors were scratching their heads. From The Week:

In reality, "Boy with Apple" isn't a centuries-old masterpiece by a Czech painter. It was created just two years ago by the acclaimed English painter Michael Taylor. Fortunately, the real-life origin story of "Boy with Apple" is just as interesting as the one presented in The Grand Budapest Hotel. To get the full story on "Boy with Apple," The Week reached out to Michael Taylor and Ed Munro, the boy who served as the model for the painting.

The painter said Wes Anderson provided “a lot of input — particularly paintings by Bronzino, Holbein, Cranach; all sorts of stuff.” You can see the Cranach in the kid’s hand.

Related: Another lost silent film turns up in a closet. It’s this:

That was 91 years ago. The movie is “Love, life and Laughter, starring Betty Balfour, and it’s one of the British Film Institute’s 75 missing films. Well, 74 to go.

The article also has a complete copy of the movie’s ad campaign booklet, which ultra-20 images such as this: Betty did a comedy for that noted master of hilarity, Alfred Hitchcock. The entire film survives, and the print quality is remarkably good. Here’s half a minute from 1928. Even in a comedy he made the audience jump.

WRAPPED IN PLASTIC AV Club reports that Laura Palmer’s parting words are coming true:.

When Laura Palmer cryptically told Agent Dale Cooper “I’ll see you again in 25 years” in the final episode of Twin Peaks, she wasn’t talking about Twitter. Or was she? As of March 25, “1989,” a group of Twitter users operating under the banner of Enter The Lodge have taken it upon themselves to give Twin Peaks a third season.

More here.

VotD The page says “Flour Power,” but knowing Russia, it’s probably asbestos.

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