This blog covers everything except sports and gardening, unless we find a really good link about using dead professional bowlers for mulch. The author is a StarTribune columnist, has been passing off fiction and hyperbole as insight since 1997, has run his own website since the Jurassic era of AOL, and was online when today’s college sophomores were a year away from being born. So get off his lawn.

Everything is Awesome!

Posted by: James Lileks under Architecture, Praise, Technology Updated: February 18, 2014 - 12:10 PM

First day above freezing in a month! Many websites are reporting the news with an exclamation point! Because it's good! So let's do it for every blog entry here! Everything is awesome!

ARCHITORTURE A new Frank Gehry building! It’s in Panama City!

It looks like a Transformer attempted to turn himself into a toddler’s toy while drunk!

Okay, I'm done with that. Speaking of Gehry, Archinect looks at a withering critique of the architect’s work and reputation, and asks: “Gehry worst living architect? Reasonable critique or typical Gizmodo link bait?”

Don’t know why they have to be mutually exclusive. The comments at Archinect are full of hurt and surprise that the author would say these things, as if it encourages the booboisie somehow.

TV Entertainment Weekly asks: Could the HBO series HBO “Rise Again?”  Sure.  Tthey could start “The Sopranos: the Next Generation” if they wanted, too. But they won’t. Someone else could, though. Here’s a surprising comment from the series’s creator, Bruno Heller:

“Funnily enough, the sets are still there. They look very beautiful and are ready to go. But realistically, the thing with anything that’s come and gone, is this business is so much about what’s next. It’s difficult to get things going again just because they should be. There has to be a very strong commercial reason, as well.”

The sets are still there. They are extraordinary:

It was one of the best shows HBO did, but the chances of it coming back are equal to “Carnival” returning. Heck, I’d tie “Carnival” coming out on Blu-ray.

SCIENCE! In retrospect, driving into Manhattan and expecting to find parking was one of the dumbest things I could have done, so I was relieved when the car turned into a scooter halfway up the parking ramp. I still ended up leaving it someone’s living room before running down to the office building. The particulars of the dream are quite sharp now, but they’ll fade; it’s not useful information the brain needs to keep. Why did I remember the dream so vividly in the first place, though? Scientists may have the answer.

WAR Is Facebook under any obligation to preserve history? No. I’m pretty sure that’s in the agreement everyone signs without reading. But Atlantic notes how the history of the Syria war is disappearing, as both sides attempt to wipe each other off the map of social media.

Like many towns in Syria, Kafranbel has a Local Coordination Committee (LCC) and media center page on Facebook, both of which are used to spread news of the revolution, document the dead, and distribute safety information to residents. In a country where foreign and independent Syrian journalists are barred, and the regime’s expansive network of citizen-spies makes public discussion of the revolution dangerous to this day, Facebook was one of the first refuges for Syria’s dissidents—and now it has become one of their last. . . . the social network’s recent decisions to shut down dozens of opposition pages, including the Kafranbel Media Center that Hamidou administered in exile, have dealt a significant blow to peaceful activists who have grown reliant on Facebook for communication and uncensored—if bloody and graphic—reporting on the war’s atrocities. It’s only the latest chapter in Syria’s well-documented Facebook wars, but it threatens to be the final one for the non-violent voices who sparked the revolution to upend 40 years of oppressive Assad family rule.

Well, there’s always Twitter. Daily Beast has this, which seems to be a uniquely modern combination of “deadly” and “petty.”

In March 2012, Omar Hammami, the American jihadist who called himself Abu Mansour al Amriki and fought for Shabaab, al-Qaeda’s branch in Somalia, released a short videotape claiming his life was in danger. But Hammami wasn’t fearful that American or Somali forces were pursuing him. Instead, he feared that Shabaab’s emir might kill him him due to differences with strategy and the implementation of Islamic law.  Shabaab responded on its Twitter account, and denied that Hammami was targeted for death. Hammami followed his video by taking to Twitter to lash out at Shabaab and its emir. Hammami even released his autobiography via Twitter.  The Twitter War between Hammami and Shabaab continued for 18 months until Shabaab finally tired of the American’s critiques and sent its secret intelligence unit to execute him and a Brit follower. 

Charming people.

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