This blog covers everything except sports and gardening, unless we find a really good link about using dead professional bowlers for mulch. The author is a StarTribune columnist, has been passing off fiction and hyperbole as insight since 1997, has run his own website since the Jurassic era of AOL, and was online when today’s college sophomores were a year away from being born. So get off his lawn.

Our new Dolphin Overlords

Posted by: James Lileks under Praise, Technology Updated: November 5, 2013 - 1:12 PM

Looking forward to the day when you can vote from a secure, certified phone app, that's all I'm going to say. But it would have to have a screen where a senior citizen hands you off to the actual voting; wouldn't be the same otherwise.

GEEK DISMAY Headline: “Those Comics in Your Basement? Probably Worthless.” But I don’t have any comics in my basement. I have some in plastic envelopes upstairs, but I don’t think they’re worthless. Therefore this doesn’t apply to me at all, and I needn’t read it. Moving right along -

Oh, all right, for the sake of those who do have comics in the basement.

Barry T. Smith, 44, spent most of his life collecting comic books. And he always considered them an investment. “These books would someday be college tuition, or a house down payment,” Smith remembers thinking. “I would lay them all out in my parents’ living room, sorting them, cataloging them, writing down entries on graph paper while cross-referencing them against the Overstreet Price Guide.”

The entire 1,200 comic collection was worth about $500. Which, you might note, means that they had worth. To someone, anyway. No, it’s not a house payment, and yes, people overvalue their stash:

Frank Santoro, a columnist for the Comics Journal and an avid collector himself, has noticed the same trend. “More and more of these types of collections are showing up for sale,” he says. “And they’re becoming more and more devalued. The prices are dropping.” He recently had to break the bad news to a friend’s uncle, who was convinced his comic collection—about 3,000 books—was worth at least $23,000. “I told him it was probably more like $500,” Santoro says. “And a comic book store would probably only offer him $200.”

That first edition of "Beanie Baby Adventures" HAS to be worth a grand, though. C'mon.

GAMES No, gaming isn’t an art form. No, not at all.

A Brief History of Video Game Title Design from Art of the Title on Vimeo.

Just when I was thinking “where’s ‘Full Throttle’?” there it is. In a similar vein:

One does not get the sense of constant progress. But at least you’re reminded that “Aloha, Scooby Doo” existed, once. I understand all copies were destroyed.

Worth it for the music, if you need something to pep you up for the rest of the afternoon. It’s “Shopping for Explosives” by Coconut Monkeyrocket.

FLIPPER NEWS Aeon mag asks: Is there some special bond between humans and dolphins? 

At the time, I had never heard of a dolphin-human bond. As a fledgling dolphin cognition researcher, I simply didn’t know enough about dolphin behaviour to say whether she was talking science or science-fiction.

How can you be a fledgling dolphin researcher and not wonder about the dolphin-human bond?

As for the bond, I think it’s anthropomorphic projection. They’re fascinating creatures, but if they didn’t look as if they were smiling, people might not read so much into their character and actions. And I say that as someone who’s had hands-on experience with the beasts, and watched them come alongside the ship as we left port and jump up the air as if saying goodbye, or hoping we threw out some edible garbage.

Only a matter of time before they show their true faces.

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