This blog covers everything except sports and gardening, unless we find a really good link about using dead professional bowlers for mulch. The author is a StarTribune columnist, has been passing off fiction and hyperbole as insight since 1997, has run his own website since the Jurassic era of AOL, and was online when today’s college sophomores were a year away from being born. So get off his lawn.

He hit a bus. Then it gets worse

Posted by: James Lileks under Gripes, Minnesota History, Newspapers Updated: May 23, 2013 - 12:36 PM

This has a payoff that’s all better for the element of surprise and the quantity of incompetence that preceded it. Look in the upper-middle area to find the scooter-driver who collided with a car, then follow the worst minute of his life.

It is critical that you watch to the very end.

 

 

YOU THERE I hate to keep banging this gong - well, not really; I rather enjoy it - but this grates on me almost as much as LOL, Today’s utterly irritating second-person headline is from the Daily Dot: 9 Foods you’re totally eating wrong. As if they know. “Nine Clever Ways to Eat Food” would suffice, no? When did the internet become such a bossy clod?

Ever since the rise of the phrase “You’re doing it wrong,” that’s when. That was nine years ago, according to knowyourmeme.com:

The earliest known reference of “You’re Doing It Wrong” can be found in the domain name YoureDoingItWrong.com[1] registered on January 21st, 2004; however, there are no archives or records regarding the content of the site.

The first known instance of the “You’re Doing it Wrong” image macro series was created by Sabastien Grillmaier, who uploaded the image onto the Something Awful forum in August 2004.

Google Trends notes that the phrase started to take off in 2007.

So now YOU know.

 SO YOU'RE READING A BLOG POST Recall those Simpsons episodes in which someone reads a pamphlet, and it's titled "So You're Going to Become Morbidly Obese," or something like that. I think there was one in the waiting room in "Beetlejuice" - "So You're Dead," perhaps. There's a reason for the cliche: that's how pamphlets were titled.

 

It's an employee hand book from 1949. Or "employe," to use the curious spelling of the day. A sample from the section explaining how things work:

 

Bender's great-great-great (X100) grandtather, perhaps. Here's what really stuck out. Medical benefits were a bit simpler then.

 

 

A hundred bucks for a baby: that about covered it. There are various ways of calculating what $100 would be today, but this site suggests it's about $963. Which, today, would cover the cost of the paperwork for admission.

 

 

 

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