Campus Confidential scours student unions, lecture halls and dorms for the crucial and quirky stories that make colleges and universities special. Share what you’re up to on a Friday night, learning (or not) in that lecture - and what you're looking for in a school search as a new student. Higher education reporter Maura Lerner will keep you informed.

U takes heat for sex event

Posted by: Jenna Ross Updated: January 30, 2013 - 5:44 PM

The U is taking heat for hosting an event about "the big O."

An April event at the University of Minnesota, called "The Female Orgasm: A Program About Sexual Health and Women's Empowerment," welcomes "orgasm aficionados and beginners of all genders." See below.

After a conservative blog pointed out the workshop, media ran with it. "Public Universities Gone Wild," wrote U.S. News. "'O,' yes!" wrote the New York Post.

At a House committee meeting Wednesday on the university's budget, Rep. Glenn Gruenhagen, R-Glencoe, said he heard on the news about the seminar, "which some people might consider inappropriate."

He asked U officials who was paying for it.

Peg Lonnquist, director of the university's Women's Center, told lawmakers that the two-hour program was focused on sexual health, and the title was just "marketing."

"I think some of the hoopla in the media is about the first half of the title, which is female orgasms," she said. "As you know, marketing is important, and we want students to come to the program."

The event will cost $3,656 -- including a $2,800 speaking fee. It will be paid for by a mix of student fees and some state funding, according to the U.

The university "provides information on a wide range of topics," a university statement says. "The vast majority of these topics are not controversial, but some are."

Sex educators Marshall Miller and Kate Weinberg are part of a team that has given talks at 269 universities, according to its website. The Female Orgasm is the group's most popular program.

"Administrators often compliment us on presenting 'sexy' material in a tasteful, appropriate manner," the website says.

The U describes the program as "an educational opportunity for participants to talk openly in small groups about healthy sexuality and relationships broadly, and discuss and analyze the messages women receive about their bodies and sexuality from media and elsewhere."

What message is this media frenzy sending?

 

 

ADVERTISEMENT

Connect with twitterConnect with facebookConnect with Google+Connect with PinterestConnect with PinterestConnect with RssfeedConnect with email newsletters

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT