This blog covers everything except sports and gardening, unless we find a really good link about using dead professional bowlers for mulch. The author is a StarTribune columnist, has been passing off fiction and hyperbole as insight since 1997, has run his own website since the Jurassic era of AOL, and was online when today’s college sophomores were a year away from being born. So get off his lawn.

Bygone Burger Wars

Posted by: James Lileks under Outstate, Restaurants Updated: September 4, 2012 - 12:04 PM

Don’t know anyone who’s starting a diet today. Never heard anyone say “whoa, ate too much at the Fair. It’s the treadmill and cottage cheese for the next month. It’s gustatory business as usual, and if that includes hitting a fast-food joint for lunch, here’s some historical context: Original sites of famous fast-food chains.

The Dunkin Donuts page says this:

With only an eighth-grade education but a keen business sense, William "Bill" Rosenberg opened his first Dunkin' Donuts shop.

Got that? Not an eighth-grade education AND a keen business sense. He had good instincts for commerce - just think if he’d had a ninth-grade education, what he might have accomplished. 

Don’t miss the comments, because arguing about other people’s food preferences is almost as much fun as arguing about operating systems, and there’s an argument over the location of the first Burger King, and the obligatory conspiratorial comment:

why would anyone savor any of this garbage. throw the bumbs out and eat like a normal human being yah damn fat a** lazy idiots! wake up! they are trying to keep you down!

Man’s got a point. I don’t know why you’d savor a hamburger when you should be removing bumbs. Anyway, it’s an incomplete list. White Castles, but not White Towers? The latter was the Burger King to White Castle’s McDonald’s, the Kress to its Kresge’s. Today they’d be sued out of existence if they’d opened a Tower by a Castle, especially since both had the same appearance, right down to the crenellations. They went sleek and modern in the 30s:

 

 

It’s a nightclub / dancehall. Hope there’s an addition, or a door to an adjacent space, because those weren’t the largest restaurants.

This page about White Tower memories had a comment from someone who said his family went to the one on 2100 Admiral Boulevard. Well:

 

 

Probably. But you never know. See, once upon a time these places looked like this:

 

 

 

Once upon a time, the signs looked like this.

We had two in Minneapolis; long gone. Here’s the last White Tower in the country. Towards the end the chain became confused, dumped the sleek streamlined units and the jet-age 60s’s style boxes, and went for the Dreaded Colonial Look. The sign alone pains enthusiasts of roadside remnants.

  

 

 

TECH Kotaku has a piece about why Sina Weibo, the Chinese version of Twitter, just ROCKS, “even though they’re pretty much the same...” An excerpt:

According to longtime Beijing expat and Tech industry extraordinaire Frank Yu, the two most fundamental differences between Twitter and Weibo aside (government censorship, and only Chinese interface) are the features. Perhaps because to cater to the desires of the Chinese netizen, Weibo is chock full o' features, some of which should make their way to Twitter.

 The first feature that makes Weibo stand out as a better version of Twitter is Weibo's ability have inline pictures and media with posts.

I am drooling with jealousy and that totally makes up for the whole “government censorship” thing

 

INTERNET ANIMALS Six seconds long? Possibly fake? Confused dog? Perfect:

 

 

 

FAIR You don’t miss it, do you? No one misses the Fair. We have our fill and it’s gone and that’s fine. But here’s something I forgot to post yesterday: two pictures by Thomas Arndt. First, a depressing picture of a depressed midway vendor, in the utterly depressing year of 1974. Look blank, my dear, as if this transient existence has robbed you of whatever small joys your miserable life contained. Perfect. Hold it.

 Here’s one of the entrance, with the word AMERICAN emphasized so you know you should look at all the details and say “that’s some mighty fine ironic underscoring there, fella.”

Beautiful day! Fall? Pshaw. Anyone says it's fall, you throw the bumbs out.

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