What’s making news in Minneapolis, reported by the Star Tribune’s team of city reporters. Send news tips to suzanne.ziegler@startribune.com.

Wednesday roundup: More noise about airport, $75 fine for snow scofflaws, a veteran's grave is marked

Posted by: James Eli Shiffer under Local business, People and neighborhoods, Politics and government, Urban living Updated: October 26, 2011 - 10:06 AM

Outrage over the airplanes' roar in the Keewaydin and Ericsson neighborhoods in south MInneapolis brought 150 people to the quarterly noise meeting of the Metropolitan Airports Commission, Pat Doyle reports. Doyle has been following this issue closely since revealing last month that a near collision prompted the FAA to reroute more takeoffs over neighborhoods unaccustomed to the din of ascending jets. The tolerance of our busy airport could drop even further if its biggest carrier, Delta, trims its workforce here, as its repayment of a loan now allows it to do without penalty, Wendy Lee reports. The airline assures everyone that it won't do that.

Property owners already get billed by the city if they don't shovel their walk and a city crew has to do it for them. Now the City Council is thinking of tacking on a $75 fine, Steve Brandt reports, although it's hard to imagine that some of the biggest offenders - banks who own foreclosed houses - would hurry up and get shoveling in the face of that penalty.

Brandt also updates us on the continuing cost of maintaining the city's infrastructure. He described in July how the city streets are falling apart, and in a report one council member calls "sobering," city public works staff concludes spending will need to double to stop the decline.

The redesign of Peavey Plaza moved forward in the City Council, despite opposition from historic preservation advocates, including one who compared it to the 1961 demolition of the Minneapolis%29">beloved Metropolitan Building, Nicole Norfleet reports.

Public safety: The death of a man Tuesday who sped away from a traffic stop and crashed into a pole happened so quickly that the police pursuit policy never came into play, Paul Walsh and Matt McKinney report.

Finally, a Civil War veteran's grave in historic Lakewood Cemetery is unmarked no more, thanks to some geneaological detective work by one of his descendents, Mary Jane Smetanka reports. The Department of Veterans Affairs and an American Legion Post picked up the cost of Gustav Vetter's new stone, which was installed with "an honor guard, a rifle salute and a flag presentation" last weekend.  

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