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Oct. 13, 1951: Burl Ives plays Glen Lake Sanatorium

Posted by: Ben Welter under Minnesota History Updated: December 25, 2010 - 2:06 PM

Celebrities such as Liberace, Bob Hope and Burl Ives, below, made frequent appearances in the Twin Cities in the 1940s and ’50s. The hokey shot of “the bearded folk singer” entertaining tuberculosis patients at the Glen Lake Sanatorium is typical of the celebrity photos in the Star Tribune library except for one thing: Although it  bears a "Tribune" stamp on the back, it's not in our files. Jill Young of Clearwater, Minn., e-mailed it to me a few days ago.

Who liberated it from the library? Hard to say, but that’s her uncle, Kenneth Berg, center, and another bathrobed resident, Chester Maday, helping Ives with a ballad. Ives won an Academy Award for his role as a rancher in 1958’s “The Big Country.” But most of us know him best as the voice of the snowman in “Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer.”

Scroll on for more Star and Tribune photos of the incomparable Mr. Ives. The captions are the originals. Do you recognize any of the local folks?

 

Oct. 15, 1951: ALL JOIN IN: Burl Ives, the bearded folk singer, got help on one ballad from patients Kenneth Berg (center), Lancaster, Minn., and Chester Maday (right), 5317 Forty-seventh avenue S., when he entertained at the Glen Lake sanatorium. Ives is currently appearing at the Nicollet hotel. (Minneapolis Tribune)

 

Feb. 17, 1948: BALLAD SINGER BURL IVES “TALKS A LITTLE, SINGS A LITTLE” / Fans Connie Gjelhaug and Marie Geist [of University High School] interview him at press conference. (Minneapolis Tribune)

 

Oct. 19, 1948: Though six-foot two inch, 240-pound Ives is on a diet, he still can’t resist an occasional pastry. For topping, Ives, an amateur chef, puts on non-fattening yami-yogurt, made from goat’s milk. Here he shows Radisson chef Paul Peyrat how much. (Minneapolis Star)

 

March 3, 1950: HOW ABOUT SOME FLOSS CANDY? Richard Doscher, 11, 4421 Forty-second avenue S., and Michael Decher, 12, 4034 Logan avenue N., attending the Shrine circus as guests of Zuhrah temple, get some special attention from another circus spectator, Burl Ives. The youngster were among outpatients of the Shriners Hospital for Crippled Children who were circus guests. Gallad singer Ives is appearing at the Radisson hotel Flame room. (Minneapolis Star)

 

Sept. 1, 1951: BURL IVES, the eminent goat fancier, yogurt culturist and folk singer, industriously applied strips of mending tape to his battered guitar case. A photographer, who had given the tape to Ives for a picture “prop,” asked the bearded singer would he please stop taping and stand still a minute. “You think I’m not going to use this stuff when it’s for free?” (Minneapolis Star)

 

Oct. 2, 1951: [This is raw caption information from the back of the photo] WAF recruiting. Air force has booth in Sears store. Pfc. Marilyn Wagstrom, 1500 Lincoln Ct. NE., Burl Ives and Joyce Berger, 3916 37th Av. S. (Minneapolis Tribune)

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