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Continued: Full Disclosure: A mission to clear his uncle's name

  • Article by: JAMES ELI SHIFFER , Star Tribune
  • Last update: June 7, 2014 - 5:15 PM

A couple of weeks later, an advertisement appeared in the newspaper announcing the reopening of Swing City, “under new management.”

Fietek’s story would have been buried with him had his nephew not pestered everyone in sight with his relentless research. Patrin hoped he could get the death certificate corrected, maybe prompt the authorities to reopen the investigation. So far, he has contented himself with the journalists and historians who have, finally, listened.

I asked Patrin what his uncle would think of his mission. He looked up from his binders and took a breath.

“I think he would have been proud of me, because I never gave up on him.”

 

Contact James Eli Shiffer at james.shiffer@startribune.com or 612-673-4116. Read his blog at startribune.com/fulldisclosure.





 

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