Hey, buddy, find your own nest!

  • Updated: May 20, 2014 - 9:20 PM

A young eagle squawked in its nest Tuesday as Jim Campbell-Spickler, a forest canopy biologist working with the National Park Service, climbed a tree to collect the month-old bird for testing and tagging. The Park Service is collecting blood and feathers from young eagles along the Mississippi River to measure contaminants they ingest and fitting them with leg bands so the birds can be identified if they are ever captured again. This eagle was too young to have its blood drawn, so it was measured and weighed and returned safely to its nest.

Photo: Provided by Jim Campbell-Spickler • Eco-Ascension Research and Consulting, California,

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  • he National Park Service is collecting blood and feathers from young eagles along the Mississippi River on Tuesday to measure contaminants they ingest and fitting them with leg bands so the birds can be identified if they are ever captured again. Jim Campbell-Spickler, a "forest canopy biologist," climbed a tree and collected a 4-week old eagle for the sample. Because the eagle was too young to draw blood, the eagle was measured and weighed and returned safely to its nest. ] SHARI GROSS/STAR TRIBUNE

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