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Posts about Values and morals

Immortals and Crazy Things

Posted by: Updated: November 15, 2011 - 7:57 AM

 Currently being treated to blaring techno music... it's like being in a conservative, catholic rave.

 

We are definitely not in Kansas.

 

Although, I've never been to Kansas. What is it like?

 

Some Nantes News you may find interesting (I laughed).

 

Nantes has been chosen as the newest international big fancy shmancy airport city. Great for when I want to come visit all my friends and host family, although there have been some protests. About 3,000 people rode bike (RODE BIKE) to Paris to protest. Endorphins from manifestations (protests) are enough, we need to get a 15 hour bike ride in there.

 

Their main concern? There will be tractors on the runway. Heads up, it's not that far out in the boonies.

 

You could conceivably make this argument for Minneapolis as well. I have been asked the following.

-Is it true you have the world's biggest mall full of red necks? (Welcome to Fleet Farm)

-Does everyone wear plaid there? (We started it! #Hipsternation)

-Why do you live there? (Why don't you?)

 

FOUR French Phrases I Adore

 

Utopiste: Someone who believes in "utopia," or a paradise on earth.

 

Apprendre en s'amusant: Learning whilst amusing oneself. Welcome to my gap year!

 

Autodidacte: Someone who learns for themself, without the help of a teacher.

 

Bof: B.O.F. (yes this is an acronym). Stands for Beurre Oeuf Fromage. Butter egg cheese. Means redneck.

 

Now an introduction to the peculiarities of French society...

 

In France, a mystical country, there exists a language, a Romance language in fact. It is called French. There are between 90-110 MILLION native speakers around the world. It still serves in many cases as the language of diplomacy, despite losing ground to english, as it is much better than english for technical situations. It is much harder to pin dictators, swindlers, and rule breakers down in vague english than in deadly specific french.

 

Unlike English, which as far as I know is fairly unregimented and roams as free as whatever word you want to create, French is very strict.

 

Very strict.

 

There is an Academy, "Académie Française", which decides which words every year are "French" and therefore are permissible for politicians, soccer players, public personas and postal workers to use. And for the rest of us.

 

Made up of the "immortals" (I kid you not), these ever living (but not) personages are charged with the important task of making up new words to combat other languages encroaching on their verbal territory.

 

For instance, computer. Ordinateur.

 

Or Ipad. Tablette tactile.

 

Anyways, creeping on their internet page, I can only spot two women in their forty seat-table. How disappointing.

 

Recent drama according to Google involves the Unofficial (I should probably Uncapitalize that) feminization of various professions, as the academy (pardon, The Academy) insists one must use the correct (masculine) noun. In English, we have less of this problem, because so much slang enters our language and gets spat back out. Hence, people not understanding me when I say that I hear there's a dishy thrash round the corner.

 

 

      

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