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Continued: 1956 airliner crash over Grand Canyon remembered for helping spur major flight safety changes

  • Article by: FELICIA FONSECA , Associated Press
  • Last update: July 8, 2014 - 7:20 PM

The recovery operation was one of the most extensive and dangerous in the history of the National Park Service. Rescuers had to contend with harsh terrain, swirling winds and the remoteness of the crash sites where the wreckage was twisted, broken and melted. United brought in a Swiss mountain rescue group and the Colorado Mountain Club to help.

The crash sites near the confluence of the Colorado and Little Colorado rivers now are closed off to the public and being preserved for their place in history.

"The Park Service has to manage those sites as the resting place for those 128 souls," Grand Canyon National Park archaeologist Ian Hough said. "In many different ways, those people are still there."

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