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Continued: Where to eat in Chicago now

  • Article by: RAPHAEL KADUSHIN , Special to the Star Tribune
  • Last update: November 9, 2013 - 2:00 PM

The Best of the New

The rush to be Chicago’s freshest culinary face is one tight race. Fat Rice has won a lot of attention for its Macanese cuisine, represented by the eponymous arroz gordo signature dish that comes loaded with everything from Chinese sausage to Portuguese chicken. Curtis Duffy’s haute Grace wins cred as the most extravagant splurge kitchen, for its 10- to 12-course tasting menus; Kai Zan is dishing up serious purist sushi (no overstuffed designer rolls); Tanta Chicago’s Peruvian menu rediscovers a whole gastronomic world; and Stephanie Izard’s Little Goat Diner (sister to her celebrated Girl & the Goat) competes with Antique Taco for title of most buzzed-about cheap eats contender. But the most seductive surprise may be the Carriage House, if only because it eschews global border hopping for All-American Southern regional standbys like shrimp and grits and Charleston she-crab soup (along with updated Low Country inventions, including an oyster roast with buttermilk aioli). Don’t fill up, though. Eataly Chicago, the supersized Mario Batali Italian food court, is about to open its doors.

Raphael Kadushin, senior acquisitions editor at the University of Wisconsin Press, writes about food and travel at Epicurious.com, National Geographic Traveler, Condé Nast Traveler and other national magazines.









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  • Chicago dining address book

    Saturday November 9, 2013

    Antique Taco: antiquetaco.com; 1360 N. Milwaukee Av.; 1-773-687-8697Avec: avecrestaurant.com; 615 W. Randolph St.; 1-312-377-2002BellyQ: bellyQchicago.com; 1400 W. Randolph St.; 1-312-563-1010Big...

  • Belly Q’s increasing focus on Korean comfort food promises sharply curated meals.

  • Avec, in the hands of chef Perry Hendrix, has kept its focus on its famous focaccia and vegetarian dishes, but now has some of his own remarkable offerings, as well.

  • A bowl of yakitori don at Sumi Robata Bar.

  • Cashiers try to keep up with the crush of customers at the opening of Xoco, Rick Bayless' new restaurant of Mexican street food, Tuesday, September 8 2009 . (Alex Garcia/Chicago Tribune) ..OUTSIDE TRIBUNE CO.- NO MAGS, NO SALES, NO INTERNET, NO TV, CHICAGO OUT.. 00310797A xoco ORG XMIT: CHI0909081650170284

  • Chef Rick Bayless prepares another dish at the opening of Xoco, his new restaurant of Mexican street food, Tuesday, September 8 2009. He is planning on being at the restaurant the first week to keep things running smoothly. (Alex Garcia/Chicago Tribune) ..OUTSIDE TRIBUNE CO.- NO MAGS, NO SALES, NO INTERNET, NO TV, CHICAGO OUT.. 00310797A xoco ORG XMIT: CHI0909081651060288

  • Diners at Belly Q, left, can choose from such fare as chicken in sweet chili and lime or smoky baby-back pork ribs roused by homemade hoisin. At right, Chef Rick Bayless prepared a dish at XOCO, which is near his famous Topolobampo, but less expensive. The café’s tortas can be had for less than $12.

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