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Posts about Baking

Minnesota's Bake-Off recipes

Posted by: Rick Nelson Updated: November 13, 2013 - 3:08 PM

Minnesota did not send the largest number of competitors to the 46th Pillsbury Bake-Off, held earlier this week in Las Vegas. That distinction is held by two states -- Texas and Pennsylvania, with 10 cooks each.

Among the Bake-Off's 100 finalists were four Minnesotans (the million-dollar winner was Glori Spriggs of Henderson, Nev., for her Loaded Potato Pinwheels). Here are their recipes:

ON THE GO BREAKFAST COOKIES

Makes about 2 dozen cookies.

Note: From Beverly Batty of Forest Lake.

1 package Pillsbury Big Deluxe refrigerated oatmeal raisin cookies

1/2 c. Pillsbury Creamy Supreme Coconut Pecan Frosting

1/2 c. quick-cooking or old-fashioned oats

1/4 c. flaxseed

1 c. walnuts, coarsely chopped '

2 tbsp. sweetened dried cranberries

1/2 c. unsweetened shredded coconut

Directions

Preheat oven to 350 degrees and line baking sheets with parchment paper.

Let cookie dough stand at room temperature for 10 minutes. In a bowl of an electric mixer on medium speed, combine cookie dough, frosting, oats, flaxseed, walnuts, cranberries and coconut and mix until thoroughly combined.Drop dough by rounded tablespoonfuls 2 inches apart on prepared cookie sheets. Bake until edges are light golden brown, about 12 to 16 minutes. Remove from oven and cool 2 minutes before transferring cookies to a wire rack to cool completely. 

MINI ITALIAN SHEPHERD'S PIES

Makes 36 appetizers.

Note: From Sonya Goergen of Moorhead.

1 box (9 oz) Green Giant® frozen chopped spinach, divided

1 lb, extra lean (at least 90%) ground beef

1/2 c. finely chopped onion

1 c. marinara sauce

1 box Pillsbury® refrigerated pie crusts, softened as directed on box

1 package (24 oz) refrigerated mashed potatoes (about 2 1/2 c.)

2/3 c. grated Parmesan cheese

1/4 tsp. salt

1/4 tsp. freshly ground black pepper

Directions

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Spray 36 mini-muffin cups with non-stick cooking spray. In a microwave oven, cook frozen spinach to thaw, about 3 to 4 minutes. Remove from oven and squeeze spinach dry with paper towels. In a medium skillet over medium-high heat, brown ground beef, breaking up large pieces, until meat is no longer pink, about 4 to 5 minutes. Stir in onion and cook 3 to 4 minutes until tender. Drain pan of oil. Stir in marinara sauce and half of the spinach.

Meanwhile, unroll pie crusts. Using 2 1/4-inch round cookie cutter, cut 18 rounds from each crust, rerolling dough if necessary. Press each round in bottom and up side of muffin cups. Spoon rounded tablespoon meat mixture in each cup.

In a microwave oven, cook mashed potatoes as directed on package, about 2 to 3 minutes. In a medium bowl, mix potatoes, remaining spinach, cheese, salt and pepper until well blended. Top each cup with a rounded tablespoon of potato mixture. Bake until potatoes are golden brown, 20 to 25 minutes. Remove from oven and cool 2 minutes. Run a knife around edge of cups to loosen pies. Serve warm.

SEEDS AND CHOCOLATE PASTRY WEDGES

Serves 12.

Note: From Vicki Mager of Bloomington.

1 Pillsbury refrigerated pie crust, at room temperature 

2 1/4 tsp. sugar

3/4 tsp. ground cinnamon

1/3 c. dried currants

1/4 c. roasted unsalted sunflower nuts

1/4 c. roasted salted hulled pumpkin seeds (pepitas)

1/4 c. Jif Chocolate Flavored Hazelnut Spread

Directions

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Unroll pie crust on an ungreased baking sheet. Pinch outside edge of crust to form a 1/4-inch rim. Prick dough several times with fork. In small bowl, mix sugar and cinnamon and sprinkle evenly over crust. In medium bowl, mix currants, sunflowers nuts and pumpkin seeds. Sprinkle mixture over crust. Press mixture firmly into crust. Cover loosely with aluminum foil and bake for 10 minutes. Remove aluminum foil and bake until edges are light golden brown, about 3 to 6 minutes longer. Remove from oven and immediately cut into 12 wedges. Do not separate wedges. Spoon chocolate hazelnut spread into decorating bag or 1-quart resealable food storage plastic bag; seal bag. Cut off tiny corner of bag; squeeze bag to drizzle spread over seeds. Cool completely.

ORANGE CARDAMOM BLUEBERRY CROSTATA

Serves 6.

Note: From Cathy Wiechert of Mound.

1 Pillsbury refrigerated pie crust, at room temperature 

1/2 c. Smucker's Orchard's Finest Pacific Grove Orange Marmalade Medley

2 tbsp. flour 

1/4 tsp. ground cardamom

2 c. fresh blueberries

1 egg yolk

1 to 2 tbsp. coarse white sparkling sugar

Directions

Preheat oven to 425 degrees and line a 15x-10-inch baking pan with sides with parchment paper. Unroll pie crust in prepared pan. In medium bowl, mix preserves, flour and cardamom. Carefully fold in blueberries. Spoon mixture over crust to within 2 inches of edge. Fold edge of crust over filling, pleating crust as necessary. In small bowl, beat egg yolk with two teaspoons water. Lightly brush crust edge with egg mixture; sprinkle with sugar. Bake until crust is golden brown and filling is bubbly, 17 to 23 minutes. Remove from oven and cool at least 30 minutes before serving.

Monday is the big day for the Pillsbury Bake-Off

Posted by: Rick Nelson Updated: November 10, 2013 - 9:41 AM
Doughboy image courtesy of Pillsbury.

 

The 46th Pillsbury Bake-Off takes place on Monday in Las Vegas (for the first time in the contest's 64-year history), and four Minnesotans are among the 100 finalists.

This year's Bake-Off finds competitors in three recipe divisions: Amazing Doable Dinners, Simple Sweets and Starters and Quick Rise and Shine Breakfasts.Recipes must have seven ingredients or less and require 30 minutes or less in preparation time.

There's plenty on the line: $1 million to the grand-prize winner. From there, the drop-off is steep: $10,000 for second place, along with $5,000 for third place and four $5,000 special award winners. (Doughboy image, above, courtesy of Pillsbury). 

The four Minnesotans are: 

Beverly Batty of Forest Lake, preparing On the Go Breakfast Cookies (which calls for Pillsbury refrigerated oatmeal raisin cookies and Pillsbury Creamy Supreme Coconut Pecan Frosting). 

Sonya Goergen of Moorhead, preparing Mini Italian Shepherd's Pies (which features Green Giant frozen chopped spinach and Pillsbury refrigerated pie crusts). 

Vicki Mager of Bloomington, preparing Seeds and Chocolate Pastry Wedges (which features Pillsbury refrigerated pie crusts). 

Cathy Wiechert, preparing Orange Cardamom Blueberry Crostata (which uses Pillsbury refrigerated pie crust and flour). 

Track the contest's progress on Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest and Instagram

Doughboy image courtesy of Pillsbury.

Do you have a favorite Bake-Off recipe? Mine is Peanut Blossom cookies, from the 1957 Bake-Off. 

Quick (honest, they are) cinnamon buns

Posted by: Rick Nelson Updated: October 19, 2013 - 2:12 PM

There it was, perched on a rack at the checkout at Whole Foods, taunting me: the latest issue of Cook's Country magazine.

The first shocker was that the food-porn image on the cover -- which grabbed this sweet-seeker's attention all the way from the cheese counter -- wasn't a turkey. When it comes to American food magazines and the month of November, not featuring a Thanksgiving turkey is the equivalent of slapping Zack Galifianakis on the cover of Sports Illustrated's annual swimsuit issue.

Three cheers to the person or persons on the magazine's masthead responsible for skipping the path to chestnut stuffing nirvana and instead treating readers to a drool-inducing portrayal of a knife spreading thick cream cheese icing over a pan of spiraled cinnamon buns. I know my response was embarrassingly predictable: I immediately went in search of instant yeast, cream cheese and cinnamon.

Within little more than an hour -- no exaggeration -- this was the view inside my oven:

The dough -- super-powered by far more instant yeast used in conventional recipes, and boosted by a second leavening agent, quick-acting baking powder -- came together in a snap, just a bowl and a spoon followed by a few easy minutes of kneading. 

The recipe's genius is its 30-minute proofing time. Cinnamon bun recipes that I've used in the past require a minimum of three hours for the dough to rise, in two 90-minute periods. Not here, which means that homemade cinnamon buns can be a relatively spontaneous breakfast decision. (A side benefit: You can't imagine the cinnamon-yeast scent that sneaks out of the oven and perfumes the kitchen).

Are they as habit-forming as the buns my grandmother Hedvig made when I was a kid? I wish I could say yes, but no, they're not. The quick-rise dough doesn't achieve the rich puffiness that comes with more carefully proofed breads. However, as a substitute for those tubes of cottony refrigerated dough (even the not-so-bad version from Immaculate), there's absolutely no comparison. They're also far superior to any supermarket bakery cinnamon bun that I've encountered. No doubt about it, this recipe belongs in the repertoire of every cabin baker. Certainly ever weekend baker. Next time we have company, I know what I'll be serving for breakfast.

Following true America's Test Kitchen form, author Diane Unger tinkered over successive batches until she reached this ideal formula. Find her recipe here.

Sometimes I find the ATK recipe format to be a bit confusing (Wait, who am I kidding? If I'd followed my own advice and read the recipe -- twice -- before I started, I probably wouldn't have screwed up and forced to start over). Partly for my own edification, I've re-written the recipe (below) to fit the format we use for Taste. 

Three notes: I found that Unger's recipe yielded way too much glaze (although, really, can you ever have too much glaze?). Still, the next time I pull out this recipe, I'll probably cut the amount of glaze in half. One of the recipe's most endearing qualities is the buns' intense cinnamon bite. Rather than defaulting to cinnamon that has been lingering in a tiny plastic McCormick jar in the cupboard for the past two years, growing weaker by the day, I highly recommend going to the bulk spices department at your local natural foods co-op or Whole Foods Market, where the cinnamon will be fresher than its supermarket counterpart, with a far more intense flavor and scent. It's economical, too, allowing you to buy what you need and nothing more.

QUICKER CINNAMON BUNS

Makes 8 buns.

Note: From Cook's Country magazine, which offers the following tips. The recipe requires a total of 10 tablespoons (1 stick plus 2 tablespoons) melted butter, so it's easiest to melt it all at once. Unger suggests using a dark baking pan, which will yield a much more deeply golden brown roll. If using a light-colored baking pan, increase heat to 375 degrees and adjust the baking time to 29 to 32 minutes.

For filling:

3/4 c. packed light brown sugar

1/4 c. granulated sugar

1 tbsp. ground cinnamon

1/8 tsp. salt

2 tbsp. unsalted butter, melted

1 tsp. vanilla extract

For dough:

Butter for pan

1 1/4 c. whole milk, at room temperature, divided

4 tsp. instant or rapid-rise yeast

2 tbsp. (6 tsp.) granulated sugar, divided

2 3/4 c. flour, plus extra for kneading dough

2 1/2 tsp. baking powder

3/4 tsp, salt

6 tbsp. unsalted butter, melted, and divided

For glaze:

3 oz. cream cheese, at room temperature

2 tbsp. unsalted butter, melted 

2 tbsp. whole milk

1/2 tsp. vanilla extract

1/8 tsp. salt

1 c. powdered sugar, sifted

Directions

To prepare filling: In a medium bowl, combine brown sugar, granulated sugar, cinnamon and salt. Stir in melted butter and vanilla extract until mixture resembles wet sand. Set aside.

To prepare dough: Grease a dark 9-inch round cake pan, line with parchment paper and grease parchment. Heat 1/4 cup milk in a small bowl in a microwave oven to 110 degrees (about 10 to 20 seconds). Stir in yeast and 1 teaspoon granulated sugar and let sit until mixture is bubbly, about 5 minutes.

In a large bowl, whisk together flour, baking powder, salt and remaining 5 teaspoons granulated sugar. Stir in 2 tablespoons melted butter, yeast mixture and remaining 1 cup milk until dough forms (dough will be sticky). Transfer dough to a well-floured work surface and knead until a smooth ball forms, about 2 minutes.

Using a lightly floured rolling pin, roll dough into a 12x9-inch rectangle, with the long side parallel to the counter edge. Brush dough all over with 2 tablespoons butter, leaving a 1/2-inch border on the far long edge. Sprinkle dough evenly with filling, then press filling firmly into dough. Using a bench scraper or spatula, if necessary, loosen dough from the work surface. Roll dough away from you into a tight log and pinch seam to seal.

Roll log seam side down and cut into 8 equal pieces. Stand buns on end and gently re-form ends that were pinched during cutting. Place 1 bun in center of prepared pan and others around perimeter of pan, seams facing in. Brush tops of buns with remaining 2 tablespoons butter. Cover buns loosely with plastic wrap and let rise for 30 minutes. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Discard plastic and bake buns until edges are well browned, 23 to 25 minutes. Remove from oven and, using a paring knife, loosen buns from side of pan. Transfer pan to a wire rack and cool for 5 minutes. Invert a large plate over pan. Using potholders, flip plate and pan upside down; remove pan and parchment. Reinvert buns onto a wire rack, set wire rack inside a parchment-lined rimmed baking sheet and let cool for 5 minutes.

To prepare glaze: In a large bowl, whisk together cream cheese, butter, milk, vanilla extract and salt until smooth. Whisk in powdered sugar until smooth. Using a spatula, spread glaze evenly over tops of buns. Serve warm.

Snow-day doughnuts

Posted by: Rick Nelson Updated: April 11, 2013 - 9:41 AM

 

 

Today's snowstorm knocked out my plan to drop by Mel-O-Glaze or Mojo Monkey Donuts -- just a few of the doughnut-makers featured in today's Taste rundown on don't-miss doughnuts -- to pick up some deep-fried goodies for my colleagues. Sorry, guys.

I mean, driving any more than I have to when the roads are this bad? Forget it. I don't want to even drive to the end of our alley. But pulling out our heavy-duty Staub cast-iron pot and engaging in a little a.m. deep frying? Why not? 

 

 

By some miracle, we had all the ingredients for making old-fashioned sour cream doughnuts, and for reasons unknown, I remembered that I had a doughnut cutter in our kitchen's tool drawer. Talk about your rainy- (OK, snowy-) day good fortune.

I've only made doughnuts once before, at a remote lake cabin, on a similarly precipitation-ruined day, and here's what I'd forgotten about the process: it's really easy. 

My results may not be on the same level as the marvelous cake doughnuts at A Baker's Wife's, or the Lynn on Bryant, but in a snowstorm-ed pinch, they'll do just fine. Better than fine, actually; they're moist and cakey, and have a pleasant crusty outer shell. And they came together in a snap. 

I'm left with just two concerns. First, how am I going to properly dispose of 24 ounces of vegetable oil?

But my greater worry is wondering how many of these cute little doughnuts (and doughnut holes, which I tossed in sugar and cinnamon a few moments after they came out of the pan) will actually make it all the way to the office? After all, with winter storms like this one, it's wise to keep an emergency rations kit in the car.

 

 

OLD-FASHIONED SOUR CREAM DOUGHNUTS

Makes 6 to 10 doughnuts.

From "Doughnuts: Simple and Delicious Recipes to Make at Home" by Lara Ferroni (Sasquatch Books, $16.95).

For doughnuts:

1 1/4 c. flour, plus extra for rolling out dough

1 tsp. baking soda

1 tsp. ground cinnamon

Pinch of salt

1/3 c. superfine sugar

1/4 c. sour cream

1 egg

1 tbsp. unsalted butter (or vegetable shortening), at room temperature

Vegetable oil for frying

For glaze:

1 1/2 c. powdered sugar, sifted to remove any lumps

3 to 4 tbsp. milk

2 tsp. vanilla extract

Directions

To prepare doughnuts: In a large bowl, whisk together flour, baking soda, cinnamon and salt and reserve. In a medium bowl, whisk sugar, sour cream, egg and butter (or shortening) until smooth. Add flour mixture, a little at a time, until a solid dough forms. Cover bowl with plastic wrap and refrigerate dough for 15 to 20 minutes.

On a lightly floured work surface, using a lightly floured rolling pin, roll out dough to about 1/2 inch thick. Using a 2 1/2-inch doughnut cutter, cut out doughnuts (and doughnut holes), re-rolling and re-cutting any scrap dough.

In a heavy-bottomed pot over high heat, add at least 2 inches of oil and heat until a deep-fat thermometer registers 360 degrees. Using a metal spatula, carefully place doughnuts in oil. Fry for 1 to 2 minutes per side, or until light golden brown. Remove with a slotted spoon and drain on a paper towel. Repeat with remaining doughnuts and doughnut holes. Let cool just slightly before glazing.

To prepare glaze: Place powdered sugar in a medium bowl and slowly stir in milk and vanilla extract, a little at a time, to make a smooth, pourable glaze. Dip doughnuts in glaze and transfer to a wire rack until glaze sets.

Making cornmeal (and rosemary) magic

Posted by: Rick Nelson Updated: April 4, 2013 - 7:33 AM

 

Beth Dooley's absorbing article on cornbread in this week's Taste reminded me of a favorite recipe.

It's for scones -- although they're billed as "cakes" -- and it's from a cookbook by Los Angeles baking titan Nancy Silverton. The easy-to-prepare formula calls upon the complementary flavors of cornmeal and rosemary -- such a harmonious flavor combination -- and the end result gracefully skirts the line between sweet and savory. Try them, you'll love them.

The recipe's source, Silverton's "Pastries from the La Brea Bakery," belongs on every baker's kitchen bookshelf. If for no other reason, buy it for the bran muffin recipe to end all bran muffin recipes, or for the page-turning chapter that Silverton lovingly devotes to doughnuts.

Oh, and that cornmeal from Riverbend Farm (pictured, above) that Beth wrote about? It's amazing, truly one of the region's great farmstead products. After test-driving this golden, fragrant reminder of late summer -- when I opened the package and that corn perfume hit my nostrils, my mind immediately flew to August -- I'll never bake with shelf-stable cornmeal, ever again. 

CORNCAKES

Makes 12 scones.

Note: Author Nancy Silverton suggests using extra-large eggs. From "Pastries from the La Brea Bakery" (Villard Books, $35).

3 3/4 c. unbleached pastry flour or unbleached all-purpose flour, plus extra for shaping dough

1 3/4 c. yellow cornmeal

1 tbsp. plus 1/4 tsp. baking powder

2 tsp. finely chopped fresh rosemary

3/4 c. light brown sugar, lightly packed

1 1/2 c. (3 sticks) unsalted butter, cut into 1/2-inch cubes and frozen

1 egg

1 egg yolk

2 tbsp. plus 2 tsp. mild-flavored honey, such as clover

1/2 c. plus 2 tsp. heavy cream, plus extra for brushing tops of scones

24 small tufts of fresh rosemary for garnish

Directions

Preheat oven to 350 degrees and line a baking sheet with parchment paper. In the bowl of a food processor fitted with a steel blade (or in the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with a paddle attachment), combine flour, cornmeal, baking powder, chopped rosemary and brown sugar and process (or mix) on low until incorporated. Add butter and pulse on and off a few times (or mix on low), until mixture is pale yellow and the consistency of fine meal.

Transfer mixture to a large bowl and make a well in the center. Pour in eggs, honey and cream and whisk together the liquids. Using one hand, draw in the dry ingredients, mixing until just combined.

Wash and dry your hands and dust them with flour. On a lightly floured work surface, turn out dough and knead a few times to gather it together into a ball. Roll or pat dough into a circle about 3/4 inch thick. Using a 3-inch round cutter, cut out scones, cutting as closely as possible and keeping trimmings intact.

Gather scraps, pat and press the pieces back together and cut out remaining dough. Place scones 1 inch apart on prepared baking sheet. Brush tops with cream and poke 2 small tufts of rosemary into the center of each.

Bake until slightly browned and firm to the touch, about 30 minutes. Remove from oven and cool 5 minutes before transferring scones to a wire rack to cool.

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