Gavin's story: An update by Nicole Pierson

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Children's Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota: Gavin pre-surgery

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Gavin’s story: An update by Nicole Pierson

 

By: Nicole Pierson

 

As we approach Gavin’s 17th surgery, we do so with sadness, hope, determination and caution

 

Gavin Pierson is a 7-year-old patient at Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota. His journey began on April 7, 2012 after an unexpected brain tumor diagnosis. Gavin is a tough, brave boy with hopes and dreams. These dreams start with one day winning the battle against his brain tumor, who he has named Joe Bully.

 

Gavin’s journey has been filled with countless ups and downs. Last year, we hit an “up” when Gavin was granted compassionate use of a drug called Palbociclib, which is made by Pfizer. He’s the only child in the U.S. using the medicine, and it has stopped the progress of his fast-growing, benign tumor.

 

Then in October, Gavin was the first patient in the Upper Midwest to undergo a laser ablation surgery at Children’s for his brain tumor. He’s the only person in the country to have a mature teratoma successfully ablated with this laser technology.

 

After the procedure, Gavin did well and quickly bounced back. He was on the mend and doing well until Nov. 20, when we brought him into the ER. Gavin had complained of tingly feelings in his arm and leg along with sudden speech problems. The right side of his face was paralyzed, and he suddenly couldn’t speak coherently. Once in St. Paul, a CT scan showed no abnormalities, and Gavin was admitted overnight. The next morning, an MRI showed a serious and extensive blood clot in many veins in his head. The clot could have caused a stroke, bleeding, coma or death. He was put on blood thinners and remained hospitalized for almost two weeks.  

 

Gavin was tested for a blood disorder that might be causing the clots, but nothing was found. The clot is not believed to be a result of the laser procedure, but instead has become a separate hurdle that has developed slowly over time. Given that this clot is the second Gavin’s had in two years, he will likely be on blood thinners for a long time.

 

After gaining strength, energy and improving his physical abilities, Gavin required steroid treatment to decrease the blood clot swelling. While the steroids are necessary, they have so many negative side effects, including weight gain, muscle weakness and mood change.

 

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