Greengirls Helen Yarmoska, Nicole Hvidsten, Martha Buns, Connie Nelson, Kim Palmer and Mary Jane Smetanka are dishin' the dirt from the back-yard garden and beyond. Whether you're a greenthumb or greenhorn, they're eager to learn from your mishaps, mistakes - and most importantly, your sweet successes - all growing season long.

Beauty break at the Fair

Posted by: Lynn Underwood under Annuals, Flowers, Perennials Updated: August 21, 2014 - 3:48 PM

The Agriculture/Horticulture building is where you'll find beer - and fabulous flowers - at the Minnesota State Fair. If you’re heading there to taste brews made by the Minnesota Craft Brewers Guild, make sure to swing by one of the State Fair flower shows scheduled throughout the fair's run.

It’s a place to escape and get a glimpse of quiet beauty after navigating sweaty crowds, munching on food that should never be on a stick and battling for a bench at the KARE11 barn. I’m especially partial to the orchid and dahlia shows and look forward to gazing at glorious specimens that were judged the best of the best.

This year the Minnesota State Horticultural Society planted an Adopt-A-Garden that’s decked out with waterfalls, two streams and a bubbler. This garden hasn’t thrown in the trowel yet --  it’s also packed with  blooming perennials and annuals that will last through the fall. Take notes and photos on your smart phone to help plan next spring’s plant list.

Here’s the rundown:

Aug. 21-22: Cactus and succulents by the Minnesota State Horticultural Society and African violets by the African Violet Society of Minnesota.
Aug. 23-24: Gladiolus by the Minnesota Gladiolus Society.
Aug. 25-26: Minnesota State Fair Show - no idea what kind of plants are displayed.
Aug. 27-28: Floral designs by Federated Garden Clubs of Minnesota and Professional Designer of the Year Semi-finals by the Minnesota State Florist Association.
Aug. 29-30: Orchids by Orchid Society of Minnesota and bonsai by Minnesota Bonsai Society.
Aug. 31-Sept.1: Dahlias by Minnesota Dahlia Society.

The Ag/Hort building shows are from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.

What’s your must-stop flower show at the fair?

What critter made these tunnels?

Posted by: Martha Buns under Critters and pests Updated: August 19, 2014 - 8:29 AM

 

A friend of mine has some critter on the loose in her yard that's making tunnels, and is resistant to being persuaded to leave the premises. While I have critter problems, all of mine are above-ground dwellers, so I don't have experience from which to offer her advice and I'm hoping some Green Girls followers out there can help her. So it is a mole, vole, or other? And what methods have you used to get these varmints to move on?
 
She offers some clues:
 
1. The holes are under a crab apple tree, about 3 feet apart and a good 8 inches deep.
2. The tunnel is horizontal. You could run the tape measure through the hole and it would pop out the other side
3. She has dug up the tunnels, washed them out with water, smoked them, placed planters over the tunnel holes for several years in a row. She keeps them there long enough (a month or more?) to encourage it to move on. And it seems to move, until the holes re-appear late spring. Ugh!
 
What pesky animal makes these holes and how does she make them realize they've worn out their welcome?

The good, the bad and the ugly

Posted by: Kim Palmer under Annuals, Critters and pests, Flowers, Perennials, Vegetables Updated: August 18, 2014 - 4:49 PM

Gardens spring forth with high hopes, but by mid-August, the garden is what it is. It's time to savor the successes -- and write off what didn't pan out this year. Here's what's going on in my garden, the good, the bad and the ugly:

THE GOOD: We are now harvesting awesomely delicious tomatoes, plus as much basil and oregano as we can pick. Squash and peppers will soon be ripe and ready for the table. And my nasturtiums are still ablaze with tasty blooms for tossing in salads. I love the peppery kick of the flowers and the leaves. 

On the ornamental front, one of my succulents surprised me by shooting off a long arm, which is now covered with hot-pink buds. I've never gotten a succulent to flower before. Cool!

THE BAD: What happened to the morning glories? I plant them every year, usually from seed, and I typically get like three flowers, and not until early October. This year, I bought plants at the garden center, figuring that would speed up the flowering. But I still haven't seen a single bloom -- just a few feeble bud-like nubs that dried up and fell off. What the heck?

THE UGLY: An intruder has discovered my awesomely delicious tomatoes. Every morning when I check the vines, there are two or three more tomatoes with giant gaping bites taken out of them. I suspect the bold chipmunk I often see darting around my deck. But we also have an army of squirrels snacking on maple seeds in the tree right above my tomato pots, so it could be one of them. I'm glad they're enjoying them -- we have enough to share.

What's good, bad or just-plain ugly in your garden, now that summer is winding down?

Garden party glory

Posted by: Lynn Underwood under Annuals, Flowers, Perennials Updated: August 14, 2014 - 3:01 PM

By the end of August, my garden looks like the dead zone.

It’s far from a colorful festive setting when I celebrate my son’s birthday right before Labor Day. Each year, I invite the family over for a party. Without fail - the green-thumb relatives head to the back yard or on the high deck to see what’s happening in the gardens. Without fail - they're disappointed.

The plants look like a birthday balloon that's slowing losing its helium after the party is over. Bee balm, black-eyed Susans and coneflowers are past their mid summer peak. The mass of phlox are spent and even the prolific moneywort has sprouted its last yellow flower. Thank God, the hydrangea bushes are still laden with plump petal balls. And the Autumn Joy sedum is just hitting its stride.

Sure, I could infuse bursts of vibrant color with garden variety annuals - petunias, impatiens and zinnias. But they never flourish in my mostly low, wet beds so they’re always relegated to patio pots. I’ve planted  New England asters, but they took their sweet time and didn’t bloom until mid September - weeks after the party was over.

I’d like a garden the family will gush over - not take one glance and then head inside for chips and salsa. I''ve got to be strategic in timing my garden glory.

What perennials can I plant next spring - in sunny and partial shade areas - that will reliably deliver gorgeous foliage and color right before Labor Day?

Gardens are sometimes the best mysteries!

Posted by: Helen Yarmoska under Vegetables, Weeds Updated: August 13, 2014 - 8:27 AM

Sometimes gardening is a mystery.  Because I’m a Master Gardener, people think I know all the answers. 

Certainly, there are gardeners that do… but I’m not one of them.  Throughout the growing season, I get handed bags with weeds or bugs and phones with photos and asked, “What is it?”

Some are easy, some require research.  Of course I like the easy ones because it makes me look smart, but the toughies can be a fun challenge.  The first photo is an easy one.  “Milkweed.  Let that grow so the monarchs have something to eat.”

The second photo is a bit different.  They are beets in a tiered garden that doesn’t get much air circulation.  “Fungal disease,” I reply.  But,  I need to know more.  I find that it is botrytis.  A fancy name for something you don’t want on your beets.  Everything I read said, remove from garden, discard - do not compost and wash your tools with bleach after removal.  Similar to tomato blight, there is no easy answer to tell the gardener.  There will be a reduced crop and don’t plant beets there again for a couple of years.

That said, many mystery plants can be fun.  Like in the third photo case, a mystery squash.  Let it grow and see what color it turns, then eat it.  I’m thinking a pumpkin by the looks of the stem, but maybe not.

Have you had mystery plants pop up in your yard?

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