Greengirls Helen Yarmoska, Nicole Hvidsten, Martha Buns, Connie Nelson, Kim Palmer and Mary Jane Smetanka are dishin' the dirt from the back-yard garden and beyond. Whether you're a greenthumb or greenhorn, they're eager to learn from your mishaps, mistakes - and most importantly, your sweet successes - all growing season long.

A home to show - and garden to grow.

Posted by: Helen Yarmoska under Lawn care, Perennials Updated: July 23, 2014 - 8:45 AM

A friend of mine has plans on selling his house so asked me over for a “garden consultation.”  Most of his garden time was spent in the back yard where he spent time with his family.  However, he wanted the front yard to pop so that when people drove by, the wanted to see more.

It’s a beautiful old stucco house with magnificent wood accents.  He had just removed two large overgrown arborvitaes and was looking for replacement ideas.  When I got there, I realized there was more removal that needed to happen.  He had bushes that blocked walkways -- one of landscaping’s no-nos.  I recommended keeping the shovel out and removing those two bushes.

We did the walk around and the back yard and front yard were bi-polar.  The back was a combination of peaceful repose for parents with areas of unique plants and a large green lawn space for children and dogs.  It was fenced in nicely with a well-kept privacy fence and terraced back area that was not too dangerous or steep for curious boys.  The area to the side of the house was fully shaded and the only area in the back that might need some work.

Then it came to ideas for the front, he wanted to keep the budget relatively low, but still wanted the “wow” factor.   I noticed a few shrub rose bushes in the back that could be moved to the front.   But he has limited time and moving roses is not fun.  Besides, I already gave him the task of removing two bushes.  

“Let’s go with hydrangeas out front,” I said.  “Peonies?  What about coreopsis and sedum?”  I didn’t see the “magnificent idea” look on his face.  What I saw was.  “eh, common.”  Although he never said it, I could tell by the plantings in the back he wanted more.  “I could divide up some of my hostas and snow-in-the-mountain for the side garden,” I enthusiastically chimed in.  He said, “Really, snow-in-the-mountain.”

At this point, I hoped to slap him into reality.  “You’re moving.  You won’t have to deal with invasive snow-in-the-mountain!  The hostas are the plain green kind, but they’re free and spread quickly.  Plus, the peonies are on clearance now at the garden center.  Add some bright petunias and new mulch in the front and it will look fantastic.”   

I think he expected more from this Master Gardener.  But that’s what I had -- common, easy-to-grow, abundant plants.  They can be gorgeous and make for quick beauty.  Maybe I’m too practical – or too cheap – but I didn’t go with adding $50 shrubs and $20 perennials.  That would be the next owner’s creative palate to fill.  

Did I do my friend wrong?

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