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Continued: Feeders don't turn birds into addicts

  • Article by: VAL CUNNINGHAM , Contributing Writer
  • Last update: March 18, 2014 - 3:32 PM

Q: After days of below-zero temperatures, we were shocked to see five robins on the edge of our woods. How can this be?

A: It’s not all that unusual to see robins in our area in wintertime. Every December the metro-area Christmas Bird Count records a number of robins. As long as these big thrushes can find food (berries and other fruit) and open water, they’re content. At this time of year you may find them on crabapple, buckthorn, sumac and grape plants, gobbling up any shriveled fruit. And they’re adept at finding seeps and springs for a drink and a bath. Sometimes the robins we think of as the first birds of spring are in reality birds that have been here all winter.

St. Paul resident Val Cunningham, who volunteers with the St. Paul Audubon Society and writes about nature, can be reached at val​writes@comcast.net.

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