The toolkit: Fog-free shower mirror

  • Article by: AKRON BEACON-JOURNAL
  • Updated: December 24, 2012 - 11:52 AM

A roundup of home improvement products or advice.

The Shower ClearMirror gives users a better view for shaving or removing makeup in the shower.

The mirror, designed for permanent installation, has a thin heating pad behind it that warms it to 102 degrees to eliminate condensation and keep it fog-free. It connects to a low-voltage electrical system for safe operation.

The mirror is available in three standard sizes, starting at 12-inch square, as well as custom sizes and shapes. The heating pad and transformer can also be ordered without the mirror to use in custom installations.

The Shower ClearMirror is made by NewHome Bath and Mirror of Woodbury, and can be ordered at www.ClearMirror.com at prices starting at $325. It's also available at some bath and plumbing showrooms.

Energy-efficient advice

If you're serious about buttoning up your home, Bruce Harley's "Insulate & Weatherize" (Taunton Press, $21.95) offers serious advice.

Harley, an energy-efficiency expert with a background in electrical engineering and energy auditing, takes a comprehensive approach to the topic. He helps readers understand the science behind air movement, heat loss and moisture buildup in a home, and then guides them in pinpointing and solving problems.

The book covers air sealing, insulating and weatherizing, as well as related issues such as providing adequate ventilation, choosing heating and cooling systems and reducing energy use. The illustrated how-to information is useful for homeowners who just want to perform basic tasks such as sealing gaps in a wall or caulking around window frames, and it's also appropriate for ambitious do-it-yourselfers taking on big projects like blowing insulation into exterior walls.

Wood spot removal

Q What do you recommend for getting a white spot out of my mahogany dining room table? I think something hot was set on the table when the pad wasn't on.

A The white spot is caused by moisture trapped between layers of the finish, said John S. Wilkie of Revere Refinishing in Norton, Ohio. He suggested removing the spot by warming it with a hair dryer or rubbing it with superfine steel wool (number 0000) and a lubricant such as lemon oil, working in the direction of the wood grain. Oil and steel wool work best with a glossy finish, he said, since the oil will give the spot some shine.

Or you can just wait it out. Sometimes the spot will go away on its own, Wilkie said.

AKRON BEACON JOURNAL

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