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Continued: Japanese garden: peace and perseverance

  • Article by: CONNIE NELSON , Home
  • Last update: March 27, 2009 - 10:09 AM

Contrast, texture and abstraction are part of a traditional Japanese garden. So is change. Change is represented in the plants, which are selected because they change with the seasons, and in water, which is constantly in motion. Change is present in Logan's garden, too.

Today, Mendota Heights is a suburb, not a small town. Logan's house is surrounded by other houses. And a Japanese garden is not the rarity it once was. Logan, 77, continues to tend her Japanese garden with the help of a steadfast friend, Edward Nedelcoff. They've introduced some changes to make caring for the garden a little easier. They've let some of the streams turn to dry beds. They've replaced some of the high-maintenance rock with lower-maintenance wood-chip mulch. But the garden still has the power it once had -- the power of peace.

"It can be a burden at times," Logan said. "But anything that's worthwhile can be a burden. It's very much a part of me now. It's my favorite spot in the world."

-- Connie Nelson is at cnelson@startribune.com.

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