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Continued: Minnesota's new way of seeing patients has improved health care results, researchers say

  • Article by: JEREMY OLSON , Star Tribune
  • Last update: February 20, 2014 - 9:23 PM

“This has completely changed the way I have been able to practice in the office,” said Dr. Kris Kopski, medical director of innovations for the Park Nicollet Health Services.

Thursday’s reports, which were required as part of the legislation that approved health care home funding, also showed patients in better health.

Among asthmatic adults, 42 percent using health care homes in 2011 had optimal control of their diseases, compared with only 23 percent using traditional clinics. Patients with vascular diseases such as clogged arteries were also much more likely to have ideal levels of cholesterol and blood pressure if they were using health care homes.

Winger serves on a family council that supports the state health care home project. One of the benefits, she said, is that doctors in health care homes must consult patients about their care goals up front.

“Not everybody that has the exact same chronic condition has the exact same life,” she said. “They have different goals. They have different interests.”

 

Jeremy Olson • 612-673-7744

  • 2008 reforms

    Health reforms enacted by the 2008 Legislature included incentives for doctors and clinics to improve coordination of patient care and grants to local communities to promote exercise and healthy eating.

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